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Why I Hate Amazon and Will Never Ever Ever Buy From Them Again

I will try to keep my cool while I write this post, but every time I discuss this topic I get red in the face and my blood pressure rises. You will probably see lots of all caps words. The passion I have for this topic makes me want to write this WHOLE POST in all caps, but I know how annoying that is to read, so I’ll try to be judicious in using all caps.

I’ve meant to talk for a while about why I don’t buy from Amazon and never will again, but the recent drop in the price of Kindle has prompted me to write this post. I’ll try to organize my thoughts, but it’s likely that they’ll be scattered. I fear that I won’t be able to accurately articulate  my frustration, my fear, and my anger, but I’ll try.

The Basics

While I might choose to shop at my local independent bookstore (and wish more pople did the same), ultimately I have no problem with people going to a big chain bookstore to purchase books. Even chain bookstores are INHERENTLY INTERESTED in the future of publishing. But if publishing went south tomorrow? Amazon wouldn’t even BAT AN EYE. THEY DO NOT CARE WHAT HAPPENS TO BOOKS.

Everyone knows that Amazon sells books at a deep, deep discount, particularly hardcovers, new releases, and bestsellers. Why would they do that? It’s not because they’re philanthropic. It’s because once they’ve got you at their store, there’s a good chance you’ll buy something that they DO make money on, i.e. electronics and other things they actually make money on. In business terms, this is called a loss leader. E-books have also been a loss leader for Amazon so it can “gain loyalty and market share.” So the industry that I’m so invested in, the industry that supplies my hobby, that makes me think outside of the box, that entertains me, that teaches me, that helps me connect with other people, that industry? Amazon would only care if books died because they’d have to find a new loss leader. That is not a company that has the best interests of publishing at its heart.

________

Amazon is a big bully.

You can read about the whole kerfluffle from Charles Stross and John Scalzi, but here’s the gist: Macmillan said, ‘We want you to charge x amount for our ebooks.’ Amazon said, ‘Fuck you. We want to charge less.’ Macmillan said, ‘No, these are our books, we think you’re setting an expectation with readers about ebook prices that we can’t sustain, and we want you to charge x amount for ebooks.’ Amazon’s response? Remove ALL THE BUY BUTTONS FROM ALL OF MACMILLANS titles. Effectively saying, Let’s see if we can make you do it OUR WAY by taking away your ability to sell your books through the biggest book retailer on earth.

HOW IS THAT OKAY?!!! Sure, I can let big companies duke it out, but I WILL NOT support a company that plays dirty (which is why I also don’t shop at WalMart).

This is a great article: The Trouble With Amazon. The article is well worth reading, but the part that made me recoil in horror is the story that one publisher has of trying to stand up to Amazon, refusing to give Amazon such a deep discount on books because it’s ILLEGAL. What did Amazon do?

“I was at the Book Expo in New York and two guys from Amazon came to see me. They said that the company was watching what we were doing and that they strongly advised us to get in line. I was shocked at how blatant the pressure was.” Within a couple of days Johnson noticed that the buy buttons for his books had been taken off Amazon’s site, making Melville’s titles unavailable.

WHY would I support a company that for all intents and purposes is a Mafia-like organization?

________

Last year at BEA I won a Kindle from GetGlue. Shortly after this MacMillan business went down, I gave the Kindle away because I couldn’t stomach supporting a company that I consider to be evil. Even reading free books off of their device seemed wrong.

I may someday buy a Nook or an iPad, but I will never ever buy a Kindle.

I mentioned that I won’t buy books or anything else at Amazon. The reason I was buying from Amazon before was because it was cheap and convenient. But I’ve decided that if I’m not going to support Amazon, then I AM going to support locally owned businesses or the actual business on the Internet that is supplying the ‘thing’ that I want to buy that I would have previously bought from Amazon. Guess what I’ve found? That buying locally/directly isn’t cost prohibitive for me. I paid $5 more for my messenger bag that I use every day by buying it directly from the supplier as opposed to ordering it from Amazon. $5 to me is nothing. It’s throwaway money. But to a business? That’s profit that I’m putting in A PERSON’S POCKET, as opposed to filling Amazon’s coffers. Supporting a person versus supporting a corporation? Do I really need to answer that?

And if I want an electronic device, I’ll go to Best Buy or Costco, but I don’t need cheap prices enough to turn a blind eye to what Amazon is doing. Nothing is worth that.

________

In this article titled In Defense of Amazon, said that Amazon is only providing people with what they want: cheaper products. But have we not learned that cheaper isn’t always better? And when has a company with as much power as Amazon has ever been a good thing?

You will not convince me that cheaper prices evolving the way Amazon has pushed the industry is beneficial to anyone.

________

I know that my not buying from Amazon and telling all my friends I won’t buy from Amazon won’t hurt them in the least. But I will not support what Amazon represents by buying books or anything else from them.

(Thanks to @KatherineBoG for helping solidify my opinions about Amazon.)

263 comments »

263 Responses to “Why I Hate Amazon and Will Never Ever Ever Buy From Them Again”

  1. Jenn's Bookshelves ()

    I’m not a big fan of Amazon myself. I think I’ve made that clear in posts and tweets about how much I dislike their control over publishers and the books they sell.

    Yes, I still link to Amazon in my reviews. Shame on me! Why do I do it? Well, I have this lovely feature embedded in my blog that allows users to hover over a title and a lovely box appears giving them info about the book. To date, I don’t know if any other online bookseller, indie or not, that does this.

    That said, once I have some time, I am planning on establishing affiliates with other online (and indie!) retailers. I think the benefits of doing this would outweigh the loss of the lovely feature I have on my blog. Actually, your post really got me thinking about this and I’m bumping it to the top of my to-do list. Thanks, Trish, for making this a priority for me!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I can’t argue that Amazon doesn’t have good widgets. They do! My only goal was to get people to think, and it looks to me like you’re thinking, so my job is done. :)

    [Reply]

    Wallace Reply:

    I link to Powell’s. They don’t have anything like the widgets that Amazon does, but they have some nice options of how to link and showcase books (and if you hover over the kink it shows you the book page).

    [Reply]

    Bill Reply:

    I have to agree with what everyone is saying about how terrible Amazon is, but for different reasons. What the fuck is up with them not even listing a phone number. I ordered a computer backup drive from them 3TB that cost $423, then found out the way I wanted to use it was not supported by Apple. I called Amazon to return it and they said you have to go to Eek Technology. Then I find out for a product that I have had for a week that I will have to pay for the return shipping and a 15% re stocking fee! Yeah that’s right over $60 for me to have the privilege of returning a product I never even used! I called Amazon to complain, and of course they said sorry there is nothing we can do. Then went on to say we even have the same policy. I have ordered tons of things online and have never been charged a restocking fee. I will never use Amazon again, and will tell all my friends. Like someone said, you trust them, but boy I will never make that mistake again. Also the iPad is a million times better than the Kindle, who would ever buy that piece of shit.

    [Reply]

    Susan Reply:

    I know it’s frustrating to have to pay a re-stocking fee. I have been there myself. But I don’t know of any co. that does not charge a re-stocking fee for tech products when the item has to be mailed back. The policy should be on Amazon’s website on the product screen.

    [Reply]

    BillB Reply:

    This is stupid. If Macmillan wanted Amazon to charge more all they had to do was charge Amazon more. Most of the complaints I see here about bad purchase experiences are from people who don’t pay attention when they order something. Amazon clearly indicates when THEY are fulfilling the order, so you can expect service from them, which is exemplary, or when they are just acting a Web portal for another vendor, so you will have to deal with that vendor and their policies. It’s very simple. I have had Amazon customer service bend over backwards to remedy a problem with an order they fulfilled many times.

    [Reply]

    Hans Mouritzen Reply:

    I agree with you when it comes to the complaints about purchased merchandise because, as much as I now hate to admit it, Amazon has taken customer service to a hard to beat height, but when it comes to book selling it is a different matter. Macmillan told Amazon that they could not sell their book at those low prices, and Amazon responded by taking the “BUY” button away. Not only is this exercising monopoly, at its finest, it also hate the terrible potential of censorship.
    Believe me, I have for year been the biggest possible admire of Amazon, but I have also feared the day when they would have reached a high enough level of saturation to begin to seriously flex their muscles. Be forewarned: the next thing we may see from them is a serious interference in politics. Should that happen, it will make the Koch brothers look like kindergardeners!

    [Reply]

    Mark Reply:

    Have you as a publisher dealt with Amazon? I assure you it is not as simple as ‘charge them more’. Publishers develop a retail price based on a p&l covering their costs, overhead, development, paying the author (not sure Amazon cares about that part) and as always there is a danger in one entity dictating terms of trade, Amazon has too much control and they know it. In recent years I rarely order from Amazon, only if I can’t find an item elsewhere, I just cannot support a company that willfully flexes its muscles simply because it can.

    [Reply]

    Penny Reply:

    My problem with Amazon is they don’t follow their own reviewer rules and they allow reviews that are untrue, insulting and a pub;isher can’t say anything about it. I buy up all my books when they get discounted too low——I get so angry at Amazon and their agenda that sometimes I want to scream. When Hemingway and Mark Twain get one star reviews you now sonething is wrong with the system. They also allow competitors to drive readers to other books this way by positn bad things about a competitor book under another book, so the buyer doesn’t really compare—some revews are so far out there and off base they are ridiculous–all written with ne star by people whp never really read or understood the book–Anne Fran’s Diary was insulted on Amazon—Who could do that. I do nt purchase from Amazon anymore. Today I prayed they wpuld go out of business. I agree they are evil.

    [Reply]

    Paulj Reply:

    You should also not buy from Amazon exploit the local unemployed and do NOT pay taxes in the local country. For example they paid ZERO Business tax to the UK Government while making millions of pounds worth of profit in the UK in 2011-2012 by exploiting the unemployed by offering short-term work at minimum legal wage working shifts. Working conditions are very bad and pressure to perform to unobtainable targets is always enforced with the threat of dismissal.

    [Reply]

    GEORGE GUO Reply:

    I hate Amazon because, as a seller on Amazon, I get first hand experience with people who operate Amazon behind the scene, and I am convinced that they are all bunch of egomaniacal, psychotic jerks like its mascot, Jeff Bezos. Decisions are made and dictums are issued by these faceless individuals regularly in rude, arbitrary manner. Too often, there is no logic, no reason. They’d mention “seller’s agreement” and add pretext of “customer service” to justify their idiotic actions. But they do things based on the simple basis– they can. For example, our money is regularly frozen for weeks at a time whenever these operatives conduct “investigation” of their own choosing for the sake of “customer service.” The triggers can be high “sales velocity,” that is, you are selling faster than they think you should; or when a customer made a claim–even if it is transparently
    fraudulent. Whenever these idiots conduct an “investigation,” we stop selling on Amazon for weeks at a time. As sellers, we pay Amazon commission and are their customers too, but Amazon is a
    completely self-absorbed entity which care for nothing except exercising its whims. It’s dangerous for such a company to have such large market clout. This is a very corrupt and unscrupulous bunch.

    [Reply]

    VReyes Reply:

    I couldn’t agree more. I was a former seller on Amazon. I have never experience the hell I went thru with this company. None of their own employees knows what’s going on when it comes to their own policies and procedures. I have spent countless hours arguing with them about the seller rules, etc… We had our account frozen up to a month because a buyer purchased the wrong size and we shipped out the product that was order. The customer opened a case against us stating we should have know what actually size he needed even though he choose the incorrect size. Like I am supposed to know what size the customer actually wears and what he looks like. At the end Amazon sided with the buyer and froze our funds for a month and refunded back the customer the full amount. Plus I was stuck paying the shipping fees. This was just one of many situations with them. I currently own a Kindle and want to throw it out the window. After I heard in the news about the publishing company and Amazon. I no longer want my kindle (it was a present from my husband) and want to look into other options. I will never spend a penny with Amazon again. They are truly the Mafia of retail.

    [Reply]

    Rickcad Reply:

    I sell on Amazon and Ebay. Amazon has removed my ThumBee product for an AR15 because they say it violates their policy. I changed all my text and website to conform to their policy and they still won’t put it back up for sale. so, I did a search for AR15 and filtered by “ship by Amazon” and there are tons of items for AR15 that violate Amazon policy that Amazon is shipping. I sent them links of offending items and asked how they can take my item down and continue to ship 1000’s of items that violate the same policy. I’ve just gotten the run around and BS excuses.
    If there are others out there with the same or similar issue send a reply to this post and let’s get together for a class action law suit.

    [Reply]

  2. Danielle

    So…you support the ridiculous high prices Macmillan want to charge customers? Sometimes those prices are higher than the paperback prices.

    Further, Apple practices censorship.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I don’t believe it’s up to Amazon to dictate the prices. A company like Macmillan should be able to set their prices without Amazon trying to bully them into charging a different price.

    If I ever choose to buy an Apple product, I’ll look into their censorship. For now, I don’t own any Apple products.

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    Yeah, Apple wants to ban anything pornographic on their devices. However, their definition of pornography is questionable. Moby Dick, D.H. Lawrence were censored. That’s just stupid.

    As for Macmillan, I think $15 for an ebook is outrageous. I know this was their original price. I think they should be challenged. There is no reason why it should be that high.

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    …however, if Amazon did get its way with $9.99, there would no chance for prices to be cheaper. Amazon would have a complete monopoly for ebook pricing, which is not good.

    [Reply]

    Kimmers Reply:

    with the contracts that MacMillan made all the booksellers sign there is NO chance for less than $12.99. Too bad. It’s made me quit buying books at all (except at BAEN since they aren’t out to cheat the readers) and since I read on average 100 a year…. it’s the publishers loss. My library’s gain and my gain in my wallet and my mind since the free classics are great to reread!

    james Reply:

    Don’t you think that should be up to the consumer to decide, and not Amazon? I would like to have the choice on how much I feel a book is worth, not a middleman. That is simple economics. And I seriously doubt that Amazon’s interest on keeping the prices low is altruistic. I mean who doesn’t miss Borders or the myriad of other bookstores that have succumbed to Amazon’s cutthroat practices. Honestly, I feel as though I’ve waken from a dream only to realize it was a nightmare.

    [Reply]

    Hans Mouritzen Reply:

    Danielle, it is your right to think the price is “stupid” but it also your prerogative to not buy the book. Not to be condescending, but authors AND publishers need to make a living as well.

    [Reply]

  3. Marci ()

    I was out having lunch with a good friend of mine the other day at Red Lobster. The waitress came over just as I was handing my friend my SONY reader. She gasped literally and said is that a “kindle”? I replied no, then she went on to tell us how much she wanted one. I told her don’t buy one because they snoop about what you are reading, highlighting, etc. She went really, I replied yes, they do.

    I recommended a SONY or a KOBO here in Canada…She took my web address and thanked me.

    I won’t shop Amazon either, they are a bunch of bullies

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    AH! I forgot that they can see what you’ve highlighted in a book!! Ugh! Thanks for fighting the good fight! ;)

    [Reply]

    Jen - Devourer of Books Reply:

    Of all the terrible, creepy things that Amazon does, I think them compiling what you’ve highlighted is the absolute creepiest.

    [Reply]

    Marci Reply:

    Remember when they deleted all of those books without letting the customers knowing about it, because they didn’t have the rights to it.

    Talk about invasion of privacy. Heaven forbid that someone would be reading something that would be constituted as deviant. Will they call the police and rat you out?

    [Reply]

  4. Chrisbookarama ()

    I’m always looking at what Amazon does with a skeptical eye. I don’t trust them and I’ve never bought anything other than books from them.

    But like Jenn, I link to them. I tried to sign up for Chapters affiliate program but they’ve ignored me for months. Either they are lazy or just don’t care. On the other hand I am lazy myself for linking to Amazon because it is convenient.

    One of these days, my conscience will get the better of me and I will drop them.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Ugh! I wish Chapters would respond to you! How frustrating.

    And yeah, Amazon is particularly convenient to link to. Argh. But Powell’s is also convenient to link to in my experience. Give it a try. :)

    [Reply]

  5. Katy ()

    I stopped linking to Amazon after Macmillan too. But I also don’t like the whole rating system there and how people can give I’m an affiliate with IndieBound and The Book Depository.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Yay! Glad you’re linking to IndieBound and The Book Depository. The Book Depository is a great solution for international books/orders.

    [Reply]

    jacos Reply:

    FYI…. Amazon own The Book Depository!!!

    [Reply]

  6. Kim (Sophisticated Dorkiness) ()

    Thanks for this post, Trish. I’ve been thinking a lot about my own book buying habits lately, particularly the cheap and used books on Amazon. I don’t like doing that, precisely because of the way Amazon is messing with pricing and the book industry. I just haven’t figure out how to articulate the feeling yet, and then what I’m going to do about it exactly, but clearly I should think on it faster.

    I haven’t read the article in The Nation yet, but I’m glad it’s a good one.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    If you ever do post about it, please let me know. I’m not as articulate here as I’d like to be because every time I sat down to write or edit this post, my adrenaline started pumping because I’d get so fired up and I’d forget how to write. :)

    [Reply]

  7. Katy ()

    Well, crud, I accidentally hit enter. :-P I was going to say, I get annoyed by the review/rating system there too because people give 1 star for stupid things like no e-book available or slow shipping.

    [Reply]

    Linda Reply:

    Amazon so-called Forums are full of bullies that’ll put you out of business if you step on the wrong toes. Especially if you’re a small seller, one neg (negative feedback), and you’re toast. You know the bully who did that, but there’s nothing you can do about it.

    One bully’s name is abcman, aka Charles B. Robinson, aka C. Robin, of Santa Ana, CA. He uses his PO Box and then he’ll put you out of business in no time flat.

    Fortunately, there are ways to open a new seller’s account on Amazon, using a different name, address, e-mail address, credit card, and bank account number. You can use your TIN (taxpayer identification number) instead of your social when they request it (usually about the end of the year). If you have all this in place, logging in from a different browser will suffice. You can also use disposable e-mail addresses to create an X number of buying accounts on Amazon, and do this perfectly legally. Or, create an X number of buying accounts from the same e-mail address, using a different password for each. Why, Amazon will advise you how to do this.

    [Reply]

  8. Suzanne ()

    Great post. I haven’t purchased anything from Amazon in over a year, probably because I’ve made an effort to order books through my closest indie store. It may cost a few more dollars, as you mentioned, but the business I provide to the store is greatly appreciated (last year the store honored its top 50 customers with a reception).

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    WOW! If my local indie honored its top 50 customers with a reception, I’d be particularly motivated to make sure I only shopped there (I split my shopping between a local indie and one in the next county that has better events).

    [Reply]

  9. joebfoster ()

    Echoing my feelings. Amazon is to WalMart is to WR Grace… There are truly evil (amoral=evil in this exercise) corporations out there and to support them is to reward them. To support them because it’s slightly more convenient displays an ambivalence to your community, environment and fellow man that borders on the amoral, I think. “I know WalMart does evil things, but I can buy a Tickle Me Elmo and a rifle all in one visit.” Makes me hurt.

    As for the whole defense of Amazon as merely being a capitalist machine argument… Fuck that. “It’s just business” my ass. What the hell ever happened to ethics?

    This subject just fires me up.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Well said! It fires me up too. Apparently, ethics go by the wayside as long as we have a free-market. It’s every man for himself, and whoever or whatever you mow down in the process is no big deal. GAH!

    [Reply]

    Andrew Shaffer Reply:

    Just wish there were some huge examples I could point to re: capitalism’s lapse of ethics…oh, wait…

    [Reply]

  10. Amazon: Do or Don’t? «

    [...] the other day talking with some other bloggers (namely @trishheylady who posted this, “Why I Hate Amazon and Will Never Ever Buy From Them Again“) about Amazon, and how many of them don’t like it. The issue being that Amazon bullies [...]

  11. Robin of My Two Blessings ()

    Great write up, trish. I’ve always considered Amazon a convenience. I can get my books in two days and they always have the books I want versus my local borders or indie store. I don’t buy used stuff so that aspect doesn’t bother me. Do I want to give up that convenience. No. There is always going to be something that any company does that we dislike. There’s plenty to dislike about Amazon but plenty to like as well. There will always be pros and cons. I didn’t go for a kindle because I hate sprint. Yes, there are companiens that I won’t buy from because of their policies or politics are too blatant, etc. If I ever find a store that provides me with the benefits like amazon and the choices, then I’ll switch. But for now… too lazy to change.

    I don’t like walmart for the weird reason that it’s just plain too nosy in there. Plus they never have anything I want , too large, too busy, and too many choices. Loud noisy environments make me walk out the door every time.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I have a local indie that can order just about any book I want. That might be something to consider. Getting the book in 3-4 days versus 2 days usually isn’t an issue when I’ve done it this way. :)

    [Reply]

    Riva Laughlin Reply:

    Just FYI – Kindle doesn’t use Sprint any more. The last two versions use AT&T.

    [Reply]

  12. Wallace ()

    Thanks for this post, Trish. I was totally in the dark until we had our Twitter conversation and this article has helped me learn even more. I had just recently heard about the BEA incident, which absolutely sounds like something the mob would do! I know that sounds extreme, but my mouth was literally hanging open when I read that one.

    I DID NOT know until just now that they can see what you read and highlight on your Kindle. I’m happy to share with anyone what books I am reading, but I DO NOT feel comfortable with someone being able to see things about me without my permission. It’s just one more Big Brother thing to add to this Big Brother world. I know that also means I shouldn’t be on my computer or cell phone, but at this point I don’t have an alternative to those. I am starting to rethink my Kindle. Ugh.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I KNOW!! Threatening someone to do business with you is just incomprehensible. The hubris is just mind blowing.

    [Reply]

  13. Jennifer ()

    $5 may not be a lot to you, but it is a lot to many other people. While I can afford the luxury of buying books now, there were many years where if I couldn’t get it from Amazon, I couldn’t afford it at all. Is it better to buy from Amazon and support a loved author or just go without, leaving me without books and the authors without my few dollars?

    Sure, Amazon is a bully. It’s got the weight to throw around. Can you seriously blame them? They bully publishers. Well, maybe publishers need to be bullied every once in a while. I don’t remember anyone speaking out in defense of publishers when book bloggers were bullying them over the whitewashing scandal. Using your power to get what you think is right – if Amazon is guilty bullying, so is every book blogger who ever took a stand. You may not like their reasons behind it, but the goal was cheaper books and some of us need that.

    I’ve been shopping at Amazon for over 10 years. I don’t own a Kindle, but that’s just because the Nook was prettier. I don’t have local indie bookstores that carry adult books. Even if I did, no bookstore – even Barnes & Noble or Borders – has the selection that Amazon has. Sure, any bookstore can order a book for you, but I can do that myself at Amazon. Why pay indie bookstore prices when you can get it cheaper and faster if you order it yourself?

    I’m well aware it’s not the cool thing to do to support Amazon, but the fact is they have been giving consumers what they want at the prices they want since they first opened. They wouldn’t have amassed enough power to bully anyone if they hadn’t.

    So, yeah, that’s my 2 cents.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I know that I can afford to spend an extra $5 on something, but I know not everyone to do that. All I ask is that people think about this and then make a decision. I’m not even telling you NOT to use Amazon, just why I don’t use Amazon. However, I firmly believe that everyone makes choices, and one alternative would be to use a local library for some books, and buy less books but pay more at a local indie.

    I don’t think you can compare book bloggers who take a stand to what Amazon is doing. My taking a stand and stating why *I* won’t use Amazon is not comparable to Amazon INSISTING that things be done there way OR ELSE. This post is not telling you what to do, only giving you food for thought.

    I never said it’s not the cool thing to do to support Amazon. Every person makes their own decision. As long as you’re aware of what Amazon does, then I’ve done my job.

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    I definitely never meant that you were implying that supporting Amazon wasn’t the cool thing to do. That’s more of the general feel I get from many book lovers. Of course, there are quite a few who love their Kindles and yell loudly about their love of Amazon. I do feel that there is an atmosphere of guilt when it comes to buying from Amazon when you don’t have to, but maybe that’s just me.

    I kind of applaud anyone who takes a stand about anything ever. Even if it’s Amazon. Bloggers boycotting publishers or authors or even Amazon because of their practices is the same as Amazon not selling a particular pushlisher’s books. The things being boycotted can change, or not. It’s their prerogative. Just as it’s a publisher’s choice whether or not to cave to Amazon. Boycotting bloggers aren’t the only readers just as Amazon isn’t the only bookstore in the world. They just happen to be the biggest.

    [Reply]

    pir Reply:

    yes, i can seriously blame them. just because corruption is all around us does not mean we as individuals have to give in to it. we can make conscious choices. that’s often hard work, and i don’t blame people if they don’t always want to do it (i don’t either), but then we should at least not make feeble excuses.

    comparing amazon’s bully power to that of individual bloggers is like comparing the bully power of a herd of stampeding rhinoceri to that of a wren. an individual blogger has very little power, while amazon has sufficient power to put a publisher out of business.

    adult ebooks can be bought through fictionwise, for example, which also sells at a discount. or in many cases directly from the publishers — which happens to give a larger chunk of your money to the authors, a nice benefit.

    there are almost always alternatives to supporting the big bully.

    [Reply]

  14. KyleeJ ()

    Wow. On the rare occasion that I buy from Amazon, it’s because I received a Gift Card from someone. My mom buys from them a lot. We’ve talked about Kindles. I am definitely forwarding this to her. I hadn’t heard about the Macmillan bullying they did.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Thanks for forwarding this to your mom!

    [Reply]

  15. Reese M. ()

    Amen, Lady!! We are sisters, you and me. :) Here’s my Amazon Manifesto: http://bit.ly/93jc1i . I quoted that same incident from “The Trouble with Amazon”! :)

    I am immediately following you on twitter and subscribing to your blog. :) You’ll get a #FF shout out from me later today. :D

    *HIGH FIVE*

    ~ Reese M.
    Bibliophile Girl :)

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    *HIGH FIVE* :D

    [Reply]

  16. nikki ()

    Low prices will always come with negative externalities. The job of a well-informed public is determining whether those negative externalities are worth saving a few bucks over. Sometimes the answer is yes. Sometimes no. And the answer will be different for every person.

    $5 isn’t much to me, and it may not be much to you. But there was a time in my life when $5 was huge. At that time, merely buying books instead of waiting in queue at the library was a huge luxury for me. So you can be all mad at Amazon (and I’m right there with you) but please just recognize that your anger IS a luxury. You have an indie store close by. Many people don’t. A lot of rural folks don’t even have a Borders or B&N within an hour’s drive and have to get their books from somewhere. And oh yeah, those tend to be the people for whom $5 is really important.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Yes, you’re right, that $5 is a lot of money to some people. Everyone has to make their own decision about what works for them. But I can’t imagine that Amazon is the only choice for anymore than a small percentage of people.

    [Reply]

    Caitie F Reply:

    I am so sick of the $5 is a lot. Well if that is a lot, then you shouldn’t be buying books period. You don’t have to. Go support your local library, it is free there. Don’t use it as an excuse to buy from Amazon

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Hey, if f$5 is a lot, buy at Better World Books – you can get books there for UNDER $5 AND the money all goes to charity!

    [Reply]

  17. zibilee

    I agree that Amazon has gotten to big for it’s britches and something needs to be done. I am all about shopping where I can get cheaper books and I love that I love their wide selection, but when it comes to their bullying and their “information gathering”..well that is like the mob and very, very creepy. I am starting to feel really bad about having bought a Kindle at this point, and am thinking of switching over to another device. I am in a place where there aren’t a lot of indies and some weeks, $5 is a lot to me, but c’mon, enough is enough with Amazon. I do use their widgets for my blog, so that’s something that I will have to consider as well. I am just getting really tired of their behavior and practices, and think that they are really beginning to be unethical in the extreme. Thanks Trish for posting this, as I am just beginning to feel the wrath myself., and it’s good to know I’m not alone out there.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    :)

    [Reply]

  18. Heather ()

    Amen and AMEN! Sister, I am with you totally! It was with HORROR that I read Barnes & Noble was probably going to sell the company and with greater HORROR when I read a blogger say that Amazon should entertain the idea of buying them! My hair stood on end!!

    Unfortunately we do not have very many indie sellers around here. Most are specialized in one particular genre or are old book sellers, so I use Barnes and Noble the most (when I walk into a store). I really don’t want to walk into an Amazon store. *cringe*

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    SHUT UP!! B&N is trying to sell the company?? ACK! Man, if Amazon gets their hands on a brick and mortar store…UGH!

    [Reply]

    Marci Reply:

    It is true – Barnes and Noble IS UP FOR SALE…

    Make sure that Amazon doesn’t see this post LOL

    [Reply]

  19. Riva Laughlin ()

    First – Amazon can “see” your highlights because they save them in your book for you. So the next time you download that book, you know what you’ve highlighted. It’s a feature you can turn off if you don’t want Amazon to know what you’re highlighting.

    Second – Amazon removed 1984 from people’s Kindles not because of what the book was, but because it was illegal to sell that edition in the US. They immediately admitted that they had handled the incident badly. They refunded the purchase price of the book and gave everyone affected a $30 gift certificate.

    Third – What Macmillian (and four other big publishers – at Apple’s urging) did is fundamentally change the bookbuying business – and not in a good way (IMHO). Previously, publishers set the price that retailers (Amazon, B&N, indies, etc.) paid for e-books (typically 50% of MSRP) and the retailers then decided how much to charge the public. Now, these publishers are telling retailers (not just Amazon) how much to charge for e-books. Retailers keep 30% of this, but have no say in the price the public pays. All retailers are required to charge the same price. Sales are not allowed, discounts are not allowed, frequent buyer programs can’t be used to reduce the price, etc. Sounds a little like price fixing to me, and is being investigated as such by at least two states (so far).

    Buying local is a good idea for the community and for the industry and there are many other reasons that buying from Amazon might not be the best idea. But, I wanted to make sure that you have all the information.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Thanks for clarifying those things. However, the explanation of how Amazon sees highlights in a book doesn’t sit right with me. The book is on your Kindle, right? Which is a device that you own. Unless the book is sitting on Amazon’s server somewhere, they’re ultimately going into your personal device to see what you’ve highlighted. If I’m completely off base on how this works, let me know. :)

    Despite the price fixing that Macmillan may or may not be doing, I still find it wrong what Amazon has done to try to change the prices.

    [Reply]

    Riva Reply:

    Your books ARE stored on Amazon’s servers. That’s how you can access those books on multiple Kindles or Kindle apps. That’s also how you retain access to your books if you get a new Kindle.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Ah, okay. Appreciate your clarifying that for me!

    [Reply]

    Marci Reply:

    Regardless of if it on their servers or not, do we not have a expectation of some privacy ??

    I mean hell, if everyone did this then we all could just perform a google search and find out what you do in your bedroom late at night..or watched on tv for that matter.

    Too invasive if you ask me ! It is YOUR device, you own it outright. Seems to me they not only want to bully but also know everything you do when you do it.

    Does THAT sound fair to you ?

    Frankly, I call it an invasion of privacy…

    Riva Reply:

    As I said, it’s an optional program. If you don’t want Amazon storing your notes and highlights, turn the feature off. Then they have no idea what you’re highlighting. Of course, then you won’t have those notes and highlights available to you if you open your book on another device.

    James Reply:

    You know, I’ve always been a little leary of this new technology, and not just for the big brother acspect either. How about control? Buy a paper book, and who can take it away? If you wish to lend it or give it away, who is there to supervise the action? No one. It is yours to do as you please. Amazon does do all of this, because the control the computers that supply your ebooks. For what you’re paying, do you really own the book? How about conservation. Yes a book requires paper, and energy to produce, but once expended, the book is in a stable condition, so long as it is cared for. Hell it can even get wet in the rain, or travel worn, and still be readable. The Kindle and all of the tech behind it requires constant second to second renewal by electricity to maintain its existence. Or how about theft? Lose a book, sure it is inconvient, but not much else lost. Lose a Kindle, and panic follows. not only the cost of the Kindle, access ro your personal information. For me, I’ve come to rely on my Kindle less and less, and have started to rely on good old fashioned paper. Oh, and one more thing, who doesn’t have issues with the editing on most of the ebooks? I don’t know about most of you, but for me, I’ve grown tired of typos, bad graphics, and when it comes to poetry, classical history, or even Shakespeare, I like miss the annotations and footnotes.

    [Reply]

  20. Annette

    I recognize that you, as a consumer, can spend your hard-earned dollars anywhere you like. We all have opinions on where we shop and thankfully there are an amazing number of options both local and online.

    I do wonder, though, how is Amazon, as a retailer, not allowed to set prices (to their customers)? And work to negotiate the best costs for them and their customers? And how is MacMillan’s pressuring Amazon to increase their prices any more ethical? It’s not as though it was a new relationship, after all. Amazon was happily selling MacMillan titles before MacMillan decided to demand more money…

    The big publishing houses need a strong retailer (strong as in backed-by-customers) to drag them into the current century and force the publishers to re-evaluate their pricing structure in the wake of the ebook. Amazon has done that. And you benefit from it no matter where you shop…

    Just my opinion, of course.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Of course a retailer is allowed to try to get the best price for their customer, but I don’t think the way that Amazon has gone about it is right. Threatening another company doesn’t, ahh, strike me as a method I will choose to support or be complicit in.

    [Reply]

  21. Meghan ()

    I struggle with this myself. I know I link to Amazon, but I have been planning to switch to the Book Depository for some time now. I like them better and when I have a choice I buy from them instead.

    I personally am of the opinion that buying from Amazon is better than not buying a book. Even if they’re cheaper, the authors and publishers still earn the same amount of money, so if I can afford to buy a hardcover there over a paperback or a used book somewhere else, I will probably still buy from them.

    I am, however, buying a Kindle, but mostly because it’s the only ereader I can afford right now and I keep finding myself needing to read ebooks.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    It’s not about buying a book or not buying a book. Unless someone’s only choice is Amazon, I assume they can choose the library, a different bookstore, etc.

    [Reply]

    Meghan Reply:

    When you have one bookstore which is primarily a stationary store (unless you drive an hour), a tiny library system that doesn’t take requests, a Walmart-owned supermarket with just bestsellers, and The Book Depository doesn’t have the book, then yes, Amazon DOES tend to be the decision maker between book or no book. And it’s better to buy from them than not at all.

    Also worth noting, Amazon.co.uk does charge tax, all 17.5% of it.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    I agree. The only ‘book’ stores in my area are a WH Smith which is more of a stationary store and a Waterstones bookstore that never seems to have anything I am looking for no matter how new it is. I used to go to Borders but they closed up shop in the UK two years or so ago leaves me with no large retailer where I could get everything in one place. I have been using Amazon due to the sheer lack of any decent bookstores where I live and the fact that they have everything I need and I can look at a few pages before buying. Believe me I would rather go to a real store and enjoy looking at a wide selection and even having a look at a book before buying it.

    [Reply]

  22. Jeane

    I only link to Amazon when Powell’s doesn’t have the book to link to- it’s still got the most information to point my readers to. But I’ve been thinking about becoming an affiliate with Indiebound or the Book Depository. Between the three, I should always be able to find a title to point someone to.

    I didn’t know they had such horrible practices. I used to get quite a few used books from them, until I found book swapping sites! I think their used book prices get so low because most are sold by third-party sellers, who have their own little price wars going on.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Yes, you’re exactly right as to why their used book prices are so good. That model is a perfect case of supply and demand. When there’s few copies of a book available on Amazon (used), then the prices aren’t that great. When a book had a large printing, that’s when you generally see the penny prices for books.

    [Reply]

  23. Jeane

    PS: I hate Walmart too. My husband refuses to shop there. The other week I wanted to do some canning and went to so many stores trying to find canning jars! I was pretty discouraged when the only place I found that sold them was Walmart. I felt guilty actually buying something from them!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    LOL!! I don’t think you should feel guilty about THAT. You did what you could! :)

    [Reply]

  24. Marie

    Interesting write up. I never really keep up with the Amazon News so it’s nice to see a wrap up here. I like the Amazon feature of the wishlist and that is what has helped me categorize certain reads for me. I have shifted from Amazon for book purchases to The Book Depository and now look to Overstock.com for the other household items I would have bought on Amazon. I am glad that there are options out there so that we could pick and choose who to buy from. One thing to remember is that amazon has the “used” books where you would buy it from another seller and not technically Amazon, but I’m sure there’s a kickback or fee to amazon from those sellers.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    It’s so funny you mention the wishlist, because I do use that feature to keep track of books I want, but I won’t buy books from them. My way of sticking it to them. :D

    [Reply]

  25. Marie

    PS I had skipped The twitter name and it chose someone by itself (not me).. but at least I love Meghan!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I don’t know why it’s picking other Twitter names. Trying to figure that out!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    The wrong Twitter names are gone! Yay!

    [Reply]

  26. Rebecca @ The Book Lady's Blog ()

    AMEN SISTER.

    I think it’s also important to point out that, in most states (I think New York is the exception, thanks to extensive & effective lobbying), Amazon doesn’t pay sales tax.

    If they did, my state (Virginia) would have something like eight MILLION extra dollars per year.

    And I just can’t live with that. I’m all about the indies, where my sales tax AND my dollars go back into the local economy. Thanks for spreading the word.

    [Reply]

    Riva Reply:

    This is not just an Amazon trait. Most online retailers do not have to collect sales tax in any state where they don’t have a physical presence (warehouse, call center, offices). Buyers are supposed to file these taxes when they file their state income tax.

    [Reply]

    Riva Reply:

    In other words, just because Amazon doesn’t collect the state sales tax, that doesn’t mean the tax isn’t due. Folks who buy from Amazon – or any other online retailer – are supposed to pay this sales tax to the state themselves. There is usually a line on the state income tax form where the taxpayer is supposed to enter the amount of uncollected state sales tax. Realistically, most people don’t do this, but that hardly makes it the retailers’ fault that the tax isn’t paid.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Ugh. See!! More reason not to shop there. The list to NOT shop there gets longer and longer…

    [Reply]

  27. Meg ()

    I definitely respect what you’re saying, Trish, and agree with many of your points. Amazon’s philosophy on books as a “loss leader” is disturbing, and the whole mess with pulling the buy buttons from publishers who wouldn’t tow the line is definitely frightening and ridiculous.

    Most of my book dollars go to Borders, the only bookstore in my town. When I’m ordering online, as I often do, I try to go through Book Depository — and I’ve had a great experience with them.

    I would love to “support my local indie,” but there really isn’t one — unless I want to drive 30 miles out of my way. I do often make day trips around the area and into D.C., where I could definitely find an indie bookstore. But for my day-to-day book-buying habit, it’s not fiscally smart for me.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    If I didn’t have a local indie, I’d totally buy books at Borders. I love them as a bookstore.

    30 miles out of the way *is* far, though my other local indie is about 40 miles away, so I buy books there when I go for author events. But to go just to buy books? Too far.

    [Reply]

  28. Ashley ()

    I’m a long-time Amazon customer. And I link to them on my blog. I have the Kindle for iPhone app. Some might call me addicted to Amazon although I think that is more applicable to iTunes.

    That being said, I wasn’t aware of these practices. There is certainly a convenience factor to Amazon, but I am going to be more mindful and thoughtful about my purchases (and links) going forward.

    Thanks for posting this. It is eye-opening.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Thanks for being willing to consider this information, Ashley! That’s all I ask, no matter what you decide in the end. :)

    [Reply]

  29. Amy ()

    I think you make a really great point that cheaper is not always better. We should be paying true costs not pushing others out of business. I do have a Kindle, it was given to me as a gift and I will continue to use it, but I don’t buy any paper books from Amazon. Buying online saves me a LOT of money from my local bookstores, especially my local independent, as prices at home are quite high, but I will stick to Chapters.Indigo.ca for buying online thanks! Or Better World Books – then the profits go to charities which, to me, is even better.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Wow! I didn’t know about Better World Books! That’s really cool!

    [Reply]

  30. melanie

    I’m currently mad at IKEA – their customer service sucks. I know this has nothing to do with Amazon, but I get it.
    I make a point of shopping indie when we travel…and would love to be able to buy indie all the time. But like many bloggers, I link to them, have a Kindle, and am generally rolling around in their bed. :) I agree that big corporations don’t always handle things right, but I’m pretty sure it runs both ways (publishing vs. retail). Everyone just wants a piece of the pie.
    I think this is a fascinating debate – thanks for putting it out ther!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Thanks for putting in your two cents! :)

    [Reply]

  31. Skip ()

    Trish-
    I certainly respect your opinion and,as you know, am thinking about these issues publicly on my blog as well.

    After reading your post and some of the comments on mine, I have two main questions:
    1. How much of the money I spend at Amazon end up in writers/publishers hands v. the money I spend at a local?

    2. How much “worse” is Amazon than say Borders or B+N? Is it just size or something else? B+N’s online prices are pretty inline with Amazon’s, so it makes me wonder.

    I’m not expecting an answer, just adding to the conversation.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Skip, these are definitely great questions and worth considering.

    I don’t know the answer to these questions, except that I imagine authors get the same amount of money whether you buy a book from Amazon or a local bookstore.

    In regards to your second question, I haven’t investigated to see how bad B&N or Borders is, though honestly what appals me about Amazon is the threatening behavior that they display towards publishers (pulling buy buttons (would Borders or B&N pull all MacMillan titles from their shelves? Doubtful.), sending reps to ‘talk’ to someone who isn’t complying).

    I appreciate you adding these questions to the conversation, and particularly like more than just my opinion to be voiced! :)

    [Reply]

  32. Desperate Reader ()

    I don’t know how different amazon uk and amazon usa are, but in the uk the situation is this – we have 1 dedicated high street book retailer, they have massive control over what gets onto the high street, and when you live in a provincial city as I do the choice is limited. There are no independant bookshops in my area so I can’t support one however much I want to.
    Whatever the limitations many small independant publishers rely on amazon to get their books any kind of market, the same is true through market place for a lot of second hand booksellers.
    It maybe that they do a lot of indefensible things and I think your right to make the choice not to use them if you feel thats the case, if we all thought harder about how we shop we would all have a lot more choice, and just possibly a pricing structure that was fairer to everyone – customer, retailer and producer!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Doesn’t Book Depository ship to the UK? If Amazon’s your only choice I completely understand you using them. I’m just hard pressed to believe it *is* your only choice, particularly if we’re talking online.

    [Reply]

    Desperate Reader Reply:

    It’s not my only choice, but often it’s my prefered choice for a lot of reasons, but like you I have real concerns about any one retailer getting to big. It’s not good for anyone, but I would say again that without amazon, and of course other online booksellers many small publishers simply could not exist. I think the big thing is to actually make an active choice about how you spend your money – as your doing,it is how we can make a difference.

    [Reply]

  33. heidenkind ()

    Wonderfully said, Trish, especially the part about about putting money in the hands of an individual versus a corporation. I wish we had a local indie to support, but we don’t and I doubt we ever will. Still, at least B&N and Borders aren’t killing the publishing industry in their quest to be THE BIGGEST RETAILER ON EARTH!!!

    Speaking of B&N, rumor has it all their stores might be owned by Amazon pretty soon. *cries*

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    So you’ve heard the rumor about Amazon buying B&N too? Ugh!

    [Reply]

  34. Alison

    Oh, wow. I never thought about the discounts.

    I do buy my textbooks from Amazon. Textbooks are not something I feel bad about buying cheap. Because, hey, they’re expensive and I’m a poor college kid, I buy used, and I’ve had professors tell me about textbook authors having TAs rearrange a single chapter so a new edition can be published.

    My town only recently opened a very small independent bookstore. It has a very small selection. The town I attend college in only has used bookstores. The nearest town with a B&N or comparable bookstore is 50 miles away. I don’t buy books online. (Unless, my parents are paying. Then, I’m just supposed to pick out books until I can bump them up to free shipping on whatever site.) I prefer picking it out in person. Because of a lack of choice, though, I normally just end up at the library. It serves my purposes.

    I am still peeved at Amazon about how they wouldn’t rank any GLBT books a year or two ago because of a “glitch” that marked them as “adult content”. Amazon, a bookseller, should not be trying to censor what reading material is available!

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/emma-rubysachs/amazon-censors-gay-books_b_186153.html

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    That’s ANOTHER thing I forgot about Amazon!

    Thanks for a great comment!

    [Reply]

  35. Patty

    I love my Kindle and I enjoy buying from Amazon…the new Kindle versions are totally sold out…both the $189.00 and the $139.00. You have taken a stand and that is admirable.

    [Reply]

  36. Bonnie A

    I live in a university town of over 200,000, population. We have a B&N and a Hastings (no Borders) that have good selections of books. The B&N allows two book clubs to which I belong to meet in their lounge area. Of course, we buy from the coffee shop, too. We also have a independent book store that sells mostly textbooks, but some other titles as well. We also have a good city library system with 4 branches. We also have a couple of used book stores that will trade.
    I read a couple of books a week, so I use the library a lot, but also buy from the stores or online for my book clubs or for reviews I give occasionally. I buy a lot of used books online because of the cost. If I buy 3 books at the same time from the same seller either thru B&N or Amazon, I pay the same 3 or 4 dollars in shipping for each book. STill, $5.00 for a used book that I can’t find elsewhere, or if ordered, would cost $15 to $25, is a significant savings.
    Certainly, there are reference books and books I want to keep, so I invest in the hard cover, using my B&N 15% discount coupons that show up in my e-mail along with my 10% discount for my B&N membership. Books are my passion, and my passion is expensive.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    “Books are my passion, and my passion is expensive.” So so so true! But I love it! :)

    [Reply]

  37. Mandy (The Well-Read Wife) ()

    This post has given me A LOT to think about! Thank you for writing it. It takes much strength to put strong opinions out there! I’m definitely going to consider changing affiliate programs.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    YAY! All I was hoping is that it would make people think. What they do after that… *shrug*

    [Reply]

  38. Kylie Purdie

    Great post. I haven’t read all the replies, but I did notice one that mentioned how $5.00 is significant for some people. Check out bookdepository.co.uk. Cheap books, free delivery world wide and will quote in Australian, US, whatever currency.

    This paragraph from you post also struck me.

    “In this article titled In Defense of Amazon, said that Amazon is only providing people with what they want: cheaper products. But have we not learned that cheaper isn’t always better? And when has a company with as much power as Amazon has ever been a good thing?”

    For me it also about people only worrying about what is good for them. What do i get out of it? No need to worry about anyone else. The problem being if you are only concerned about yourself, who will be looking for you when things go wrong?

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    I didn’t realize Book Depository had free shipping. That’s pretty cool!

    It’s kind of disturbing how people don’t care what a company does, so long as they get a product for cheaper, cheaper, cheaper. *shivers*

    [Reply]

  39. Beth F ()

    I didn’t read any of the comments (too many, not enough time) — but I don’t buy at Amazon and I don’t buy at WalMart. I rarely buy at big chains if I can find a locally owned (or least independently owned) store instead. Do I buy at B&N — well, yes (no other viable choices here), but as you say, books are their business….

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    You’re like my soul sister, Beth! :D

    [Reply]

  40. Larissa ()

    Wow, amazon really do sound like bullies. :O
    I don’t buy at amazon I prefer the book depository for my books. They dispatch all over the world and they have free delivery. ^_^
    Your post really did make me think about big companies in general though. Thanks for writing this post. :)

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Thanks for reading! Appreciate what you had to say about Book Depository.

    [Reply]

  41. Lauren

    I think we tend to demonize the Amazons of the world by lumping them with the “evil” corporations. Yet, publishers are in it for their money, too, and often have some very questionable practices. Using your standard of not buying from Amazon–which has allowed for an explosion of John and Jane Does being able to self-publish–you’ve allowed the publishers to be the only gatekeepers for what books you have access to on a daily basis. Just go look at the people on the Amazon Kindle discussion lists who have been able to market themselves and amass a relatively large following of people. These same authors never would have had access to readers if they had to go through the traditional publishing channels.

    Also, I think recent events in the Amazon ebook wars show that authors and their agencies do like Amazon. Publishers are reeling (and angry) right now because authors and their agents have looked to self-publishing through the creation of Odyssey Editions. When publishers refused to reissue old editions as ebooks (due to expense, time, whatever), they took it into their own hands and started publishing their own ebooks (see Salman Rushdie, Philip Roth, VS Naipul) through their agency. And the publisher, Random House, did a lot of what you’re angry at Amazon for doing. They’ve publicly stated that they will not publish any more books by anyone using this agency. The publishers do plenty to make their own money at the expense of authors. See the link below for more info:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jul/22/authors-bypass-publishers-ebooks-amazon

    The whole Amazon thing is not black and white. They’re not evil, money-grubbing fools who don’t care about their customers or their authors. The publishers aren’t saints in this whole thing either. Ultimately, everyone has to make a decision about how their purchases are going to affect other people and the industry themselves. I just don’t know that throwing out Amazon is going to fix the situation. It’s a huge industry-wide problem where the corporations (both the book sellers and the publishers) pretty much get the option to do what they want with the people who make their living writing the books we all enjoy reading. Maybe the whole system could use some fixing.

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Yes, publishers are in it for the money too, but this post wasn’t about what publishers may or may not be doing that’s unethical. As far as publishers being gatekeepers, I don’t think they should be the only gatekeeper, but I strongly believe that the explosion of John and Jane Does being able to publish doesn’t necessarily add quality to the book world, but it definitely adds quantity.

    I actually do believe Amazon is evil, and to say that they care about their authors and customers is ignoring the fact that they don’t make money on books. The only reason they have books is to hook you in, then to hope you make other purchases.

    Yes, the whole system could use fixing, but I’m not enough of an expert to address that topic. I am, however, a potential customer that has decided not to shop at Amazon based on how they do business. I refuse to be complicit and monetarily support Amazon.

    With that said, I appreciate your providing a different viewpoint!

    [Reply]

    Trina Reply:

    Thank you for this. Everyone is so eager to jump on the “Corporations are evil bandwagon.” It’s not them or us. It’s just not that simple.

    [Reply]

  42. Malvina

    A handy place to buy books elsewhere is The Book Depository in the UK. Nice cheap prices *and no postage worldwide*. Think on that.

    [Reply]

  43. Malvina

    Apologies… I just read up the comments and saw someone else had mentioned The Book Depository. Still, it’s so worth it.

    [Reply]

  44. Anna K ()

    No one has mentioned libraries! I had no interest in a Kindle because you can’t get library ebooks on it. Also, the recent exclusive Wylie deal with Amazon makes it impossible for libraries to buy those ebooks. I, too, hate Amazon. I link to the author’s web site on my blog.

    [Reply]

  45. Emily Barton

    I refuse to shop at Amazon as well. I wish all readers would do the same. Unlike publishers and traditional book sellers, they couldn’t care less about books or us, the readers. Money is all that matters. Their $9.95 pricing on e-books is devastating to publishers and was merely a means to selling what they really wanted to sell, which was the kindle (and think about that name: kindle. What does it signify? Burning books).

    [Reply]

  46. bookmagic ()

    I would prefer to spend money at indie bookstores than chain ones. But all the indies except the specialty ones were driven out by B&N and Borders long before Amazon came along. And I live in a decent sized city. So I guess I’d rather spend my money at Amazon than B&N. They have better customer service and I do love my kindle and have ordered the new one. I also make use of my library as often as I can but the county keeps cutting back money. They don’t even have enough staff to process donated books, so they don’t accept them. I should check out The Book Depository though it has been awhile since I’ve bought anything but ebooks. I live in NY so I do pay taxes on my purchases. I wonder though, if B&N could be in the same position as Amazon, wouldn’t they? Most corporations are about making money.
    Very thought-provoking post

    [Reply]

  47. Michelle @ The True Book Addict ()

    To be honest, I hardly order from Amazon because I can’t see paying $1.00 for a used book and then paying $4.00 for shipping. I can get used books at library sales for $1.00-$2.00. Usually, I order from Better World Books because they work for a good cause and they always offer free shipping with a carbon-free option that only costs a few cents. Frankly, I can’t really afford to buy new books at all at the present time. Last time I ordered from Amazon was when I won a gift card in a giveaway!

    I am glad that I have a Sony reader–another giveaway win on which I only download free books (or textbooks for school). I’m really not liking the sound of highlighting being tracked by Amazon. Big Brother anyone? (Orwell…not TV series) I would really like an ipad someday, but if that’s true about the censorship, it will be a no go. I DETEST censorship!

    Thanks for sharing Trish!

    [Reply]

  48. Monday Tally: The Inception (and Stuff) Edition

    [...] Why I Hate Amazon and Will Never Ever Buy From Them Again (via Hey Lady! Watcha Readin’?) [...]

  49. Trina

    Okay, I don’t think I get it at all. How is it that Amazon doesn’t care about readers, but your local bookseller does? That Amazon just cares about money. Amazon cares about giving their customers what their customers want. Independent booksellers need to do the same thing. Both care about their customers and both care about money. They are both operating businesses, just different models. Publishers want to make money. Writers want to make money. Readers want to read books. And I like my money. I like to keep as much of it as I can.

    If I want to read a current hardcover bestseller, my independent bookseller will have it for $27. A larger chain will have it discounted 30% perhaps. I can get an digital edition for $9.99 (granted, I would have to have an e-reader). Certainly, it is cheaper for the publisher to create a digital version of a book. There are no printing materials involved. Future editions are files, not new print runs….

    I’m an adjunct professor and my husband is middle-upper management. We are not poor, but work hard for our money. We have two little boys, who we are trying to raise as booklovers like us. But there is something that makes me RECOIL at the cost of a new bestseller being $27. To whom are these books being marketed. A booklover, who is low income, certainly cannot afford a $27 book. So, enter the public libraries for the common people. My town’s is sad. I guess you could get yourself on the waiting list and wait and wait and wait. I find that a little insulting. It’s like the clinic vs. a nice doctor’s office. There’s something classist about it.

    Then there’s the fact that book ownership was shown to increase a child’s education success. Children raised in homes with 500 books have been shown to attend college with greater frequency. There is something to be said for “owning” a book. I used to come out of pocket when I was an urban high school teacher to buy books for my classroom library. There was no penalty for not returning a book. If you loved it, it was yours. You could keep it forever, loan it to a friend, your mom. It was amazing to see these kids sharing these books with their parents and siblings. The books were theirs to do with what they wished. It was different than just borrowing a book.

    All this to say that book ownership is a luxury that is put out of reach to some people, if prices are as high as they are in our local bookstores. I frequent them when we need books right away, and I like them. However, I also like the convenience and size of online booksellers.

    I’m not sure I buy the “Amazon is EVIL” argument. How are they anymore evil than the college textbook publishers??? They should be ashamed of themselves. I have had college students struggling to get their textbooks because they couldn’t afford them for several pay periods. That is a shame. Sad. Ridiculous. I get extras and put them in the library, so they can keep up until they get their won. When the publishers are trying to sell them to professors, you get copies without even REQUESTING them. What a scam. I am constantly receiving letters with sales pitches — Use our book next semester. Oh my goodness. They are as bad as the pharmaceutical companies at the doctors’ offices.

    [Reply]

  50. Miss Elle

    I love my Kindle and I love Amazon. I certainly do not think they are evil for saying they wanted to sell ebooks for cheaper than the publisher wanted them sold for. I heard that MacMillan themselves pulled the books from Amazon, not that Amazon took away the buy buttons. My Kindle has been amazing for me, I have fibromyalgia and find it difficult to hold open a book, or even stay awake reading a book! This led to much frustration and lost pages, and I stopped reading. Since I got my Kindle at Christmas I’ve spent more on books than I had in the past two years. Money is tight as due to my illness I can’t work, so Amazon saves the day. That and the free classics from Project Gutenberg.

    [Reply]

  51. Valerie ()

    It’s been a long time since I’ve ordered anything new from amazon. For one thing, we’ve been trying to avoid using our credit cards. The last few orders I’ve made through amazon have actually been used books, so the way I see it, I’m helping the “little guy” (whoever is selling the used book) make some bucks. Incidentally, for the commentor who mentioned shipping costs for used books on amazon — some sellers offer a free shipping option thru amazon prime.

    I recently removed my amazon.com affiliate button from my blog (I gave up linking titles to amazon in blog posts a long time ago, it was more trouble than it was worth). Now I have an affiliate link button to a local indie bookstore :-).

    [Reply]

  52. Lisa

    I definitely equate Amazon’s way of doing business to be the same as WalMart’s. There’s a company that essentially brought down Rubbermaid by insisting that they, Rubbermaid, in order to sell their products at the world’s biggest retailer of plastic storage containers, sell them at a price that was less than it cost to manufacture them. Apparently Amazon is hell bent to do the same thing to MacMillan.

    [Reply]

    Trina Reply:

    Publishers are not angelic in all of this. You can be sure that leading publishing conglomerates, such as Macmillan have had their fair share of ill dealings in the business world. I am sure they have pushed out lesser publishing houses. And like Walmart deciding what products you see on the shelf, publishing houses decided what books they will put in the bookstores and which ones they’ll promote by book bloggers and other means. Some authors are BLAMING the publishers for the ebook price wars, not Amazon.

    As for Walmart, they aren’t the bad guy. They are meeting demand. They are a business that millions of consumers support with their money, despite anti-Walmart folks trying to get their point across because at the end of the day people want to save money, bottom line. And unless you’re living some cushy life, in which you have money to burn, it matters to a lot of people trying to keep their roofs over their heads and their kids fed. If companies need to charge higher prices, there at least needs to be a darned good reason for it that customers want and can wrap their heads around. They have a responsibility to appeal to the public demand and understanding via traditional media and cheaper new media like youtube.com, Facebook, Twitter.

    [Reply]

    pir Reply:

    such a purely quantitative worldview impoverishes us all in the long run.

    [Reply]

    Riva Reply:

    Amazon is not now and never was trying to tell Macmillan how much they (Amazon) would pay for e-books. Traditionally, Macmillan set the MSRP on an e-book (typically $26 or so – same as the hard cover price). Amazon bought these e-books from Macmillan for half the MSRP ($13), then chose to use these books as loss leaders and sold them for $9.99. Under the new contract that Macmillan (and most other big publishers except Random House) forced on Amazon, Macmillan now sets the price the public will pay for e-books ($12.99 to $14.99). Amazon no longer “buys” these books, they simply act as agent and get 30% of the sale price. Amazon is not allowed to offer sales on these titles or provide any kind of discount for any reason.

    [Reply]

  53. Trina

    I don’t know every single detail of the publishing industry, but I highly doubt they are angels and Amazon is the devil. My point is that they are both corporations out to make money.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jul/27/authors-guild-amazon-andrew-wylie

    [Reply]

  54. Amy @ My Friend Amy

    I’m in the camp that believes this is a nuanced issue…here’s a good post about why: http://www.rochester.edu/College/translation/threepercent/index.php?id=2788#comment

    [Reply]

  55. Kimmers

    ” may someday buy a Nook or an iPad, but I will never ever buy a Kindle.”

    Now come on don’t be so hypocritical. Apple isn’t the same as Amazon? Puhlease! B & N isn’t the same? Puh Lease. If you don’t like Amazon’s business practices you shouldn’t be buying books from ANYone but a mom and pop. But then you are supporting the OTHER group who could care less about books, readers, or authors… the Publishers. Face it. No one is clean in this and NO ONE in any big business cares about you except for how they can keep you buying their product.

    [Reply]

  56. Coffee and a Book Chick

    Hooray!! Thanks for speaking the truth!! And I also don’t shop at Wal-Mart, ugh.

    [Reply]

  57. Jessica ()

    Okay, you already know that I’m an Amazon lover. But I thought I’d chime in here and thank you for expressing your opinion. I think that public discussion and debate about a corporation’s actions is one of the only ways to hold them accountable for what they do.

    [Reply]

  58. Jessi ()

    This is definitely something to think about. Quite sobering, actually.

    [Reply]

  59. Shay

    I haven’t purchased from Amazon for quite away & now, I won’t buy from them again until I’ve checked them out better.

    As far as electronic readers go, they’re not for me. I prefer a real book. I love the feel & the smell. I love turning the pages & holding the book while I think about all I’ve just read. For now, I buy my books from Borders until we move at which time I can actually support a mom & pop store.

    [Reply]

    Trina Reply:

    Here’s a very funny article from NPR that was written about the smell of books:

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2010/03/in_which_emphatically_and_fore.html?ft=1&f=93568166

    [Reply]

  60. Maree

    Great post. I refuse to buy from Amazon because their international postage rates (I’m in Australia) are exorbitant. Whatever I save in the price of the book (which is usually substantial…for reasons I must investigate most paperbacks in Australia retail between $15.00 – $20.00 Australian, so around $12.00 – $18.00 US which is much higher than what buyers pay in the US) is taken up in postage rates which can be as high as $8.50 FOR A SINGLE BOOK!

    I use the Book Depository UK or US now. They’re not as cheap, but they have free postage.

    It’s forever a battle between getting the best price and supporting independent businesses. I’ve seen independents charge $40 for the same book I can pick up at a chain for $15. That’s ridiculous to me and more fuel to the fire of the whole “independent bookstores are ripping us off.” I like the perspective of $5 being “throwaway money” because it totally is. I will give this whole thing some more thought!

    [Reply]

  61. jackie

    I love dialogues like these that get people talking and thinking about the choices they make – especially as consumers! And I agree with one of the last people’s comments that public debate is a way of keeping companies accountable – whistle blowers help do that too! Keep up the great work!

    [Reply]

  62. Kate ()

    I wasn’t aware of the Amazon controversy before this. I would really rather not buy from them, but I’m on a super-tight budget and couldn’t afford to buy hardly any books if it weren’t for their low prices. I don’t usually buy anything but books from them though.

    Thanks for writing this article! When/if my budget allows I will make more of an effort to support other bookstores.

    [Reply]

  63. Caitie F ()

    I love how everyone claims so many things about the publishers and doesn’t seem to get how they work at all. Most publishers set ebook prices at a $25 discount of the cheapest version. Why 25%? Because that is the cost of printing, binding, and sending out the physical books. You know, the ONLY differences between the amount of money that goes into an ebook vs a regular book. Why should ebooks be any cheaper than that? It shouldn’t be discounted more just because people think it should be. They are priced based on ACTUAL COSTS.

    If readers are paying less than that, then agents, authors, and the people who have worked on the book are not getting their share, People seem to forget that publishing is not a very profitable business. Most of their “profits” are reinvested to pay for those books that you love but weren’t huge sellers.

    I wrote about this on my blog back in January I think with more details about it

    [Reply]

  64. Nari @ The Novelworld ()

    I stopped buying from Amazon, as well as referencing Amazon on my reviews after the whole kerfuffle about hiding titles by and for the gay and lesbian community last year. I’m not surprised they would be such bullies, they are like the Walmart of the online world.

    I use the website to look up titles or do a spell check for an author/title for patrons at the library, but I try to avoid it as much as possible when in my personal life.

    [Reply]

  65. Kristinaah

    I hate amazon,because theres no such thing that ships into my country, im so mad about it, because those things i wanted for my birthday u can buy only on amazon , and guess i will just have to dream about them..i dont see why they shouldnt send something to Europe :((((( ihu amazon!

    [Reply]

  66. Snow Maysles

    I completely hate Amazon as well but mine are for different reasons. Their shipping polices are horrendous when it comes to an APO. I am working over in Japan as a civilian contract to support the US military here and Amazon doesn’t ship much to the APO. Calls and emails go unanswered or when they do get answered its only the smallest amount of empathy and empty platitudes.

    I can’t even get the mailing address, email address or phone number to someone in corporate.

    I hate Amazon.

    Buy a Nook, I love mine.

    [Reply]

  67. Trish2

    Amazon should be band. With this disgusting news about the child Abuse Book they are selling on line that was just removed because people complained. I would be embarrassed to say I work at Amazon. It should be a banned site. No child should have to go through what they seem to be promoting in free speech. It is disgusting and I and no one should ever buy from Amazon again.

    [Reply]

  68. song4mozart

    For all of you who are worried about Kindle monitoring what you read, wtf do you think happens when you log online? You might as well never go on the Internet again. Your argument loses all validity when you complain about something you yourselves are using to complain about it! What hypocrisy!

    [Reply]

  69. pir

    a) there’s a difference between amazon knowing exactly what one is reading (and not just what one has bought at amazon), being able to associate that with one’s legal name, being able to delete something off one’s personal device (!), and random companies tracking site visits. much of that information is aggregate anyway, and therefore not personal.

    b) for those who are concerned about personal usage tracking in general, that which is personal can be protected by not using legal names in connection with any account, using prepaid credit cards to make purchases, sniffing network traffic to see which applications “phone home” (and denying them), and using anonymizing proxy servers to disguise from which IP address one is browsing.

    no hypocrisy involved whatsoever.

    [Reply]

  70. Ann

    I just this week spent several days trying to get Amazon to delete all of my information. Over the holidays I order a few small things for a project that I can’t get at local stores. I made sure that they were all coming from the same vendor but the three small items came via three different shipments. The cost of the order was about $12…cost of shipping $15. I found from an internet search that Amazon insists that it’s secondary vendors use a set price for shipping (approximately $5) and that they charge it per item rather than per order. Amazon is evil….

    [Reply]

  71. Sue M

    I am an old bibliophile and don’t use the computer and would never use a pad or electronic book due to visual disability. However, I found this site because of a horrendous problem with Amazon and it is this: they are gaining a corner on the market in so many ways that I feel they are becoming a monopoly. As an aside, I get books from Powell’s or my local independent, however today I was trying to find a kitchen appliance and EVERY single so-called independent site led back to…. Amazon. Every.One. Perhaps the indie sellers find it profitable to partner, since I don’t quite know how it operates, but good luck to entrepreneurs who actually wish to sell some THING on the internet – be ready to meet the Amazon Mafia and pay the vig, or some vision I have in my head. Thus, this led me to Google (don’t get me started
    ) “hating on Amazon” by the time I was done. Which is better than other things I may have done, such as smashing my laptop.

    But it’s just my opinion, man.

    [Reply]

  72. Roger Enamorado

    Amazon has the worst customer service by far. They closed my seller account for being related to my sisters account who was closed in error. Hers remains open and mine was closed and i only ever sold one book. Their seller team is a nasty piece of work this is their answer to my issue “Further correspondence regarding the closure of your selling account will not be answered”. I WILL NEVER BUY OR SELL ON AMAZON EVER AGAIN. After this experience im selling my kindle also and investing in an iPad at least with apple you pay hefty prices but get what you deserve there never had a problem with apple. Good riddance to Amazon

    [Reply]

  73. Felice

    If you Goolge ‘Why I Hate Amazon’, this post comes up first. Well said re: Loss Leader and so forth. Good article well (and passionately) articulated.

    [Reply]

  74. E. Rae

    I hate Amazon. They ripped me off and as far as I can tell THERE IS NO RECOURSE! The A-Z Buyer’s Guantee Claims is a sham and a scam designed to keep the victim in limbo while your credit card pays up and the 60 days window of Credit Card recoup closes. I live in Seattle. Amazon is based in Seattle. Why do I only get to talk to folks in India who can only open yet another jive-ass claim?
    AMAZON, YOU SUCK, YOU BASTARDS!

    [Reply]

  75. John

    This article was pointless. You essentially said you dislike Amazon for using loss leaders and voiding a voidable contract by not selling a publisher’s material… Guess what? Businesses do this all the time! It is good to support local companies but seriously the fact that so many people think corporations are run by the devil is sickening. Amazon is doing what all businesses aim to do, make a prophit. Study some business before you make a rant. I’m happy to say I’ve been an amazon customer since 2008. And while you geniuses can hate on them all you want truth be told, eBay is horrible. P.s. Appologizing about complaints on items sold on amazon is really all they can do. The product is sold by a private seller who pays amazon some commission to list items, private seller terms are still applicable. Also e books are pointless just be smart and use the real book, its much more natural.

    [Reply]

  76. Richard Lewis

    I have had a very costly problem being an Amazon seller. My plan is to hit them with a class action lawsuit for 100 million dollars, and need to get 50 former sellers together. They suspend your selling priveledges without giving you any reason or chance to defend yourself. I sell $750,000.00 per year and have now been cut off. I plan on paying for the suit, but need 50 sellers that have had similair problems. We’ll put our names and stories together and make them pay. Please send your story to salonfind.com and I’ll then ask for your contact info and permission to be a prt of this. We have to stop the insanity right now.

    [Reply]

  77. Richard Lewis

    Funny how most of the bloggers have had problems as a buyer. I have had the same problem as Richard while selling on Amazon. They e-mailed me after 3 years and hard work while selling, and told me that I was selling unauthorized products. I appealed the e-mail right away and was given no other defense after that. They closed my selling account and left me with a basement full of inventory and no due process to defend myself. They obviously do not believe in the democratic system of America and should be
    taken to task for what they do.
    I plan on sending you all of my information and joining your law suit.
    Thanks for helping us. Jerry

    [Reply]

  78. Emily Gorman

    I hate amazon as well. I ORDERED FROM THEM SEVEN DAYS AGO (ALMOST EIGHT) AND I STILL HAVE NOT GOTTEN WHAT I ASKED FOR EVEN THOUGH I SPRANG FOR THE 3 to 5 DAY DELIVERY! GOD DAMN IT! AND THE VIDEO GAME I ORDERED FROM THEM I COULDN’T FIND AT GAME STOP, IS WHY I ORDERED FROM THEM! I AM BEING DRIVED CRAZY WAITING FOR MY STUFF! 3 to 5 DAYS MY ASS! . . . Calm down Emily . . . calm down . . .
    P.S. Very passionate article if I do say so myself.

    [Reply]

  79. John

    Lady no one cares about your books, but Amazon is just awful anything you type in on google some random amazon thing comes up if I type in lax (lacrosse) pinnies it’ll come up with some book about LAX Interantional airport.

    [Reply]

  80. Randi

    I just read your posting regarding Amazon. I don’t like them very much right now. I ordered a Kindle, but will never purchase books from them. Why purchase books I can borrow from the public library. I obtained a software that converts E-pub to kindle. I only chose the Kindle because for the price it sounded better to me then a Nook. Now my problem is the past few times I ordered something from Amazon I didn’t receive what I had ordered. I ordered a hardbound bound, I received a paperback, I ordered a set of golf clubs in pink, I got them in blue. My feelings are that:
    1) the folks in the warehouse are just stupid
    2) the folks in the warehouse don’t give a damn what they send
    The facts are that Amazon has gotten so big that true customer service has gone out the window.

    [Reply]

  81. Gavino

    I hate Amazon with a passion now. I used to love them, I love movies and music and thought they had everything I could ever want. Well, they do but I ordered some movies and a cd and here I am 2 weeks later and still my things never arrived. I have checked my tracking number and tried to call and the response I get is “It will be there” Whatever Amazon, you suck harder than Roseanne at a Dunkin Doughnuts.

    [Reply]

  82. WaterBearer

    Where to begin…….
    Ok well I ordered something and wanted 2 day shipping (I was a Prime member). So 2 days later it wasn’t on my doorstep. So I track the package. UPS forgot to put it on the truck for 2 day delivery. Oops. Ok but I still needed that item for that night and couldn’t get it anywhere else. Day 3 I tracked it. In transit (hasn’t left KY yet). Great. I contacted Amazon. They gave me a refund. I was like “ok but I still need the item”. It was too late for 1 day shipping so I said “just send the original package to me and I’ll repay upon receipt”. So someone at Amazon thought it was a good idea to have UPS hold the package for me to pick up. Well the one that I would have to drive to was like 2 hours away, so a 4+ hour round trip. So I told Amazon, “hey please tell UPS to deliver as I cannot travel that far”. They said ok. So day 4 it was still being held. I contacted Amazon and the lady said “well you already got a refund so what more would you want?” I said “well I still need the item…like 3 days ago.” So after a lot of polite bitching, she immediately contacted UPS to have it be delivered that day (day 4) and at 6pm it was delivered to me. Oh and I didn’t pay for it because Amazon was being bitchy…and dumb….

    [Reply]

  83. WaterBearer

    Oh and I can’t sell on Amazon anymore either. Apparently I “failed to send out the items in a reasonable time period”. Ok first off you said you were going to let me know when my items sold. You didn’t (I checked my junk AND spam folders!). Second you didn’t say anything about them being paid for either. So after trying to be a first time seller on Amazon I failed miserably….and I cannot sell ever again…fortunately I can sell on eBay and have a perfect track record….’cause eBay cares….obviously not Amazon….

    [Reply]

    Mary Reply:

    I had the same experience. I will never work with Amazon again.

    [Reply]

  84. Vanessa ()

    i bought a book from amazon at $79.99 and chose a 2 night shipping. well a week past buy an no book. i called fedex, they said they hadn’t recieved anything. i called amazon, and the lady was like oh yea, ill just send another one. wtf lady! that’s not the point, i made business with you guys and chose the 2night shipping for a dam reason. (i needed it asap for school).

    thats why im never buying books from them and their website ever again. im trying to blog about my incident as much as i can.

    [Reply]

    Carla Reply:

    For those who can’t find the phone number, it’s 866-216-1072. Amazon is not the enemy–it’s just another big box product of our entitlement culture. People buy from Amazon because they can with less effort, thought, and money most of the time. One click and you’re done. There’s a metaphor in there somewhere. Maybe Borders and Blockbuster could team up and create the next generation in online mega-retail. Then Amazon wouldn’t be the only monster.

    [Reply]

    Mary Reply:

    I support that 100%! How can we make that happen???

    [Reply]

  85. Andy Wilon

    As the author of an academic book that is being sold on Amazon I have come to appreciate what an ugly face sits behind the smiley customer services. Some nutter posted an inaccurate and defamatory review of my book (being sold at a stupidly high price by Amazon – no, not just down to the publisher). I complained, they removed it for a couple of months, then it reappeared. Appealed to their good judgement – huh? So, to make my point went around the Amazon website leaving critical reviews of anything connected with the Amazon boss Jeff Bezos – okay, so they went beyond “critical” but they weren’t as bad as having someone say you were a drug dealer as my reviewer did! What happened? My reviews of Bezos were removed instantly and I received a warning that my account would be suspended… Yeah, he’s sensitive to criticism!

    My idea now is a eco-tax that takes account of the impact of having goods shipped from mail order – the detrimental impact on both the environment and neighbourhood. What do you think?

    [Reply]

  86. Andy Wilson

    Entered my name wrong – above!

    [Reply]

  87. Andy Wilson

    Oh, I should add I am taking legal action against Amazon and would be interested in hearing from anyone who has had similar experience.

    [Reply]

  88. Joe Dassaro ()

    And, here is another reason to hate Amazon, from a Market Place Seller’s perspective. http://blog.dassaro.com/2011/08/24/amazon-seller-nightmare-part-i/

    In short, Jeff Bezo’s, known as a micor manager and “systems” guy has lost control of Amazon. It is being run by a bunch of incompetent fools. This is impacting every aspect of Amazon’s business. And, while they are clearly the biggest guy on the block, so were many bookstores at one point or another.

    [Reply]

  89. Mary

    I am hating Amazon because my seller account has been blocked because a few years ago I listed 5 books for sale and 2 of the sales went bad. It was my fault and I readily admit it – I had hit a major emotional snag in my life and almost everything fell through the cracks. The problem I have is that they will not forgive me. Two sales. Two. Not 200. Two. I wasn’t out to rip anyone off. I just hit a bad patch and Amazon won’t forgive. Okay, so a representative tells me to file an appeal; I do, and no one gets back to me to let me know it has been denied. However the rep, who keeps calling me sir (I am female) tells me just to open a new account with all new information such as email account and checking/credit card information. I get denied again. WTF!
    Amazon is still more than happy to take my money for things I want to purchase though. Not anymore. Not ever again. I quit amazon. I will never support them again and I plan on telling anyone that will listen about my experience. Thank you for allowing me to sound off here on this blog.

    [Reply]

  90. Sunny

    The basic rule is that they treat consumers like gold and sellers like garbage. We have been selling products with them for a long time and it ain’t fun. Consumers on Amazon in my opinion are thankless buying machines.

    [Reply]

  91. Noel ()

    I have started a website for anyone having problems with this wretched company can post and share their experiences for all to see. Please feel free to visit http://www.ihateamazon.org and share your experiences. Together we can get the word out about just how terrible this company are to deal with.

    [Reply]

  92. Mike

    Control over publishers? Are you kidding me… 99% of those publishers would never get a book deal in a million years the conventional way.

    Face it you hate Amazon because they are smart and make money… You probably also hate WalMart too?

    Instead of hiding behind your idiotic post why not face the fact that you hate people who are rich. You hate people who start a business and it becomes wildly successful. Is it Amazon’s fault they make money?

    NO

    Is it your fault for sitting on your ass complaining about it and doing nothing to make more money?

    YES

    If you were the owner of Amazon would you care about the people like you who complain about others being successful?

    We all have the same amount of time in a day in this world but you decide what you do with your time. It’s not Amazon’s fault they chose to use their time a little better than you and make a huge profit.

    Face it your a looser and always will be!

    PS. Instead of complaining about Amazon why not use them to your advantage and get published yourself. But I suspect you’ll just respond to this post with a vulgar attitude instead, which is fine… We all have a right to our opinions!

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    Actually, Mike, I do hate WalMart as well.

    I don’t complain about being successful, because I’m pretty successful myself – I run a home business that allows me to stay home with my son. So please take a step back before you assume you know my work ethic.

    You’re right — we’re all entitled to our opinions, and I don’t expect everyone to agree with me, but please keep comments civil. Your comment here is bordering on rude.

    PS Is a looser someone who is very limber?

    [Reply]

    HATE AMAZON 2 Reply:

    Mike is obviously another callous, Tea Party kind of character who doesn’t understand that large companies can eliminate all competition and become monopolies. Monopolies are not good for the consumer and other businesses in the long run. He’s another Trickle Down clown.

    [Reply]

  93. Ken

    Hooray for your post. I hate amazon; their bullying of publishers; their bullying of California to avoifd ;paying local taxes; their encouragement of peope to avoid paying sales tax; their attempts to force Barnes and Noble to carry the paper versions of books they publish but their refusal tro allow Nook editions of the same titles, and so on.

    The latest? They want their customers to snoop on local booksellers and report prices so amazon can undersell them and drive them out of busioness.

    They’re nasty.

    [Reply]

  94. Dawn Boyer ()

    I have always had the BEST customer service and history with Amazon, and if authors have their books taken down, it’s because they have done something against the Amazon publishing policies. If you don’t want to follow the rules, then don’t expect the largest bookseller in the world to help you sell the books. They are looking out for the ‘writers’ and ‘author’s’ rights, as well as the buyers when it comes to books. You can’t charge Amazon with crappy customer service is the company marketing the product (through Amazon as a middle man) is not providing the customer service – which buyers should investigate before they buy through customer reviews. The Amazon Kindle is allowing writers to publish, and the Kindle Direct Publishing, is providing a venue for first time and long-time authors to skip the expensive, money-sucking publishers hands-in-pockets, to sell their work to readers as a no-charge to the author platform! Another issue – Amazon is bringing in two huge work place in Virginia, but people are screaming that they aren’t paying state taxes – who cares? They are providing jobs for 1,300 workers in those two geographic areas and those employees are going to be paying state and federal taxes on their wages.

    So folks – get a grip!

    [Reply]

  95. Ken

    Luv ya Dawn, but I strongly disagree.

    Why should amazon get a break on state taxes when other companies don’t?

    Barnes and Noble has to pay taxes in VA, why not amazon? They provide as many – of not more – jobs.

    [Reply]

  96. Penny

    Well, if you don’t want to pay a high price for a book, don’t buy the book—Amazon will only corner the market and with publishers going with apple and nook instead of kindle, then because the deal is Ingram based, just the junk will be free on Kindle–besides, the kindle formatting is terrible—I am all for putting Amazon in its place–all they want to do is kill free enterprise and give books away—go to the library for a book if you want to read something for free! Amazon doesn’t listen to authors, ublishers, sellers–no one—they promise they will follow review guidelines and they dont–people come in and trash books because they aren’t what they expected in content—I am sick of it—authors and publishers cant even respond and say something isnt true–and iinstead of getting better, Amazon is getting worse!

    [Reply]

  97. John

    I just ordered a travel power kit for my apple products from amazon as part of a larger order. They broke out the power supply order as it was coming from a seperate vendor (after the order was placed) i admit, I did not read all the emails that went out when the order was placed, I expected them all to saynthe same thing that they have always said, 5-7 business days for delivery. I should have paid attention. This item was being sold by a HONG KONG retailer and the delivery date was one and a half months. It is bad enough that WalMart and the like have driven all our manufacturing to China in a suicidal race to the cheapest price. Now Amazon is facilitating moving our retail business to China too! I did not order from amazon.hk.

    [Reply]

  98. Mo

    Amazon is unfair to its sellers as well as its customers. Help us out and sign our petition. Thanks.

    [Reply]

  99. Jiashan Cui

    I think no one had bad experience than me, I have some balance in my accont, when they closed my account, I requested refund, Amazon said, they could not send refund to me, they can only send refund the the one who gave me gift certificate! I replied if I use credit card to buy from you, will you send refund to my boss because he paid me salary, Amazon became silence, big joke of this company.

    [Reply]

  100. Barbara

    Yes….They play Dirty!

    I am the product development manager for an online company. We decided to become a seller on Amazon….BAD IDEA! The only reason that Amazon allows other sellers to participate is to steal good ideas. We have a very niche product, and as soon as Amazon saw how well we were selling, they contacted the manufacturer, and started selling our products…and undercutted our price…UNDER OUR COST from that manufacturer.

    Then they charged US fees to give them this information and steal our marketshare. All in all…we did Millions on Amazon with NO PROFIT!

    AMAZON IS EVIL…. and is the death to good businesses out there.

    [Reply]

    Paula Reply:

    i am learning so much from the comments posted here and it makes me angry to think i’ve supported such a greedy business for many years.

    [Reply]

  101. HATE AMAZON 2 ()

    I am a small book seller on Amazon, as well as a customer. As a customer, I like them a lot, but as a seller I loathe them. It’s become very clear to me that Amazon is trying to run everyone out of business so they might become a virtual monopoly and raise prices on consumers once there’s no competition. I recently sold a book to a customer in Australia. Amazon provides a shipping credit of $12.00. The problem is that shipping the book (8 pounds) is almost $60.00. Amazon tells me that it’s my responsibility to absorb the difference. The total sale was $72.00. I had to purchase the book for $5.00 and shipping supplies (the box, tape, label) is another $2.00. I would end up making several dollars on the deal, while Amazon would make a killing. I am convinced they are trying to drive everyone else out of business. Their new pricing mechanism is slashing margins. Many of you reading this may say so what? Here’s what. If Amazon can get every small book seller out of the market, they can own it, raise prices, and do whatever they want. There’s no practice of Fair Trade with Amazon. Jeff Bezos is a disgusting creep.

    [Reply]

  102. HATE AMAZON 2 ()

    Oh, Amazon.com cares so much about their customers that they’ve now outsourced their customer service to Costa Rica. I couldn’t understand the customer service rep at all and she has no power to address any of my concerns. Good job, Jeff. It’s so good to see that you place so much importance on good customer service. Any company that outsources customer service to India, Costa Rica, Manilla, whatever, doesn’t care about you or your satisfaction, or they’d get you to someone who you can understand and can understand you.

    [Reply]

  103. Amy

    My parents bought me a Kindle for my birthday last year, and at the time i loved it. However since then I have had trouble with it. The screen keeps freezing and the battery lasts around one hour at a time. I called to tell them the problem and their solution was to charge me £40 to have another device sent as a replacement. This is ridiculous as the problems with the device are manufacturers problems not ones i created myself. Amazon is a corporate bully with backward policies who just take the piss!!!.

    [Reply]

  104. Nick R

    Amazon ALWAYS mess up my bank account. They take my money but email me (always late on a Saturday when I cannot do a damn thing about it), that “we are having trouble with your payment”. This happens ALL THE TIME. I use the same card/account details on other sites and they are fine, Amazon however just cannot get it right. I actually think that they do this on purpose to loads of people so that they get interest in their bank accounts and take ages to give it back!

    In short… DO NOT SHOP ONLINE! PAY WITH PHYSICAL MONEY AND GET YOU’RE GOODS THE OLD FASHIONED WAY!

    [Reply]

  105. Nithin Meppurathu ()

    And this is exactly why i built AuthorsAlley.com, THE alternative, and give authors what they so desperately need against amazon.

    [Reply]

    Billy Reply:

    I dig what you are doing with Authors Alley. Sure Amazon is convenient, but I think people just buy books there mostly out of habit and lack of alternatives. We as authors usually take the worst of it. We spend years writing the book, pick a printer, and if we are lucky a publisher actually opens the book up we send them in the mail and gives it a chance. We have to build a website, figure out the payment and shopping cart options, and then pay to host and find people organically. And what do we get for all of our troubles? 40% royalties and having our book hijacked through the ISBN number. Selling our book in the store/online for 12.95 and seeing it offered at Amazon for 3.99.

    I for one am ready to tell Amazon and the P.O.D’s where to go. This big monopoly game they play directing everybody to Amazon to host their book there is a freaking joke. It is refreshing to see an online book selling portal strictly designed for the authors and not just trying to make a ton of money on OUR book. You know, the one that actually wrote it. I guess my only question is do you really offer 100% royalties on each book sold from your site? I’m honestly pretty sick and tired of getting sucked in to some fine print that I didn’t see on page 37 of the contract that does not allow me to get my high res files back. Yes Lulu I’m talking to you.

    [Reply]

  106. Nithin Meppurathu ()

    yes the author gets 100% of the sale and there is no fine print you have to worry about

    [Reply]

  107. Paula

    I am sorry to learn that jeff bezos has decided to give $2.5 mil for a stupid political cause but will not acknowledge the small common people who have made him so wealthy. it seems it has been against amazon’s policy to help needy organizations, etc. Bill Gates is a decent guy with morals, but Bezos is filled with more greed than one could ever imagine. i am not against a person working hard and becoming wealthy and famous, but it is sad because it seems the people who truly want to help others don’t have the means to do so.
    i hope that more people will catch on and stop supporting such a selfish business. it is our own fault that we have created this monster!!!
    I used to like Amazon, but i will pay more and support the ‘little guys’ who are left from now on…… but i’m afraid it might be too late.

    [Reply]

  108. Steven Sanders

    I was an Amazon faithful that spend money almost every week on music, books, clothes, and other items. I even sold some of my own books and things on Amazon. When I wanted to sell my laptop to help purchase myself a new one, I turn to Amazon. I received an email thinking I sold my laptop. It looked legit and everything. Long story short the Amazon email I received to ship my computer was phished and I’m out my 13′ inch Macbook. I called and emailed the brilliant customer service folks at Amazon. They couldn’t do anything for me but apologize and say what to watch for next time.
    Not even a hundred dollar gift card or nothing for my trouble. I vowed not to involve myself with anything Amazon. They are the wrong type of internet business. I rather go to the local business or big box store to purchase things. Jeff Bezos is nothing more then an internet shakedown artist.

    [Reply]

  109. sunflower

    I recently had a dismal experience with a several-item order (it sat for seven days with no action, customer service insisted nothing was backordered, I wound up canceling it piecemeal, and when I got to the last cancellation request, the site sent an authorization to a debit card as the order was being canceled, with the result that a chunk of money is now frozen and can’t be used until the hold expires). The Pod Person response of customer service made me so very angry that I started wondering whether I’d miss Amazon if I stopped buying stuff there.

    Long story short? I wouldn’t. In fact, I went to independent online merchants for several recent office furniture and equipment purchases, almost instinctively. Why? I realized that it’s because these places have human employees attending to their customer service inquiries, not call center drones who recite from a script. Amazon reps are just a buffer against customers; they don’t resolve problems.

    Then there’s my Kindle Touch. Although I like the idea of an e-reader (I already have six full bookshelves in my home) Kindle formatted books are very poor in quality. Those artificially low prices mean that nobody checks for typos or formatting problems in their e-books either, and reporting them is worse than useless. I work as a technical editor so it is particularly frustrating to me. I have not once gotten one of their promised e-mails notifying me that errors in a book have been corrected.

    Now I’m kind of glad this happened. More and more it seems Amazon is a sham. I won’t be sorry at all to leave them behind.

    [Reply]

    Lola Reply:

    I agree, Amazon SUCKS! I have been a customer for a long time with amazon. Just last week, I registered as a seller as I wanted to sell my Kindle Fire. It sold within 4 hrs and amazon made 19.86 off my sale of 120.00. (kind of a rip off right there) anyway, the buyer of my kindle said he received “an empty box” no kindle fire inside and said I should have insured it. Oviously he has tried this scam before, he filed a claim with amazon that he got an empty box as well as filed a claim with the postoffice that he should receive re-imbursement, as well as got a refund from amazon on my behalf. Amazon believed his story, although I supplied them with proof of shipping and proof of delivery. Where is the fairness in this? I have spent a lot of money buying books for school, pc’s, tablets, kindles and presents for xmas etc through amazon. They have lost my business for good now. I am out one kindle fire, 120.00 + shipping of 10.35. Meanwhile the guy got a free kindle fire, a refund, but I luckily stopped the post office claim by telling them he already got his refund or he would have gotten their money as well!!! Some people just make it hard for everyone else to trust….So I need a new site to shop on(like amazon) but definately not them. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  110. Lola

    as site that has everything =)

    [Reply]

  111. Melanee Lillis

    Time for a little Amazon.com rant…… So I’m in the realm of “F-bomb” pissed at Amazon… I have my own “store” on Amazon that I sell my used textbooks and a few other random things at and this week I am SUPER pissed…. So here’s what happened: A guy purchased a book from me and wanted it shipped to Hawaii. No problem…. Well except for I was running a little behind in shipping (about 4 days…. yes, I know) Anyways, I let the guy know that I was shipping his item. Well I sent it USPS with a delivery conformation, as Amazon suggests. Well it seems this guy still has not gotten the book, which I would be upset too. Well instead of contacting me and saying “hey where’s my book” (even though I sent him the tracking number), He writes a scathing review on my page and then files a complaint with Amazon. Amazon sends me an email asking for shipping details and whatnot…. Now keep in mind, I have NEVER had an issue like this before. So when you look up the tracking number https://tools.usps.com/go/TrackConfirmAction_input?qtc_tLabels1=03113260000118356680&qtc_senddate1&qtc_zipcode1
    it shows the package getting to California on about the 17th of September and leaving the following day…… That’s it…. nothing else, now this item was on its way to Hawaii, but seems to be missing now. Well not only does Amazon say I am “libel” but that they are going to refund this dudes money and charge me for it and that I can contact him and “ask him to send back the book should he get it, but that he is not required to do anything” WHAT? Oh and Amazon considers this matter now CLOSED…. Well I DON’T….. I realize I would be tons of pissed too if I hadn’t gotten something I ordered, but my first complaint would have been to the POST OFFICE. and since I have absolutely zero history with something like this happening before, ZERO……. ZERO, why is AMAZON holding me responsible? They also told me that “while it’s not required, in the future I should add a delivery signature to it” Well guess what amazon, it didn’t f……..ing get there, a f….ing signature conformation wouldn’t matter for shi… OH and how would that help me with having to give them a refund AND potentially be out the product? If a signature slip is REQUIRED to not be charged if a package goes missing, then you damm well need to require it and say so on your page. I want answers AMAZON.
    Now the customer paid about $45 for the book and shipping, and so I am now out that money PLUS the cost of the book, so in my world that’s $90. Maybe $90 isn’t a big deal to “RUPA, from Amazon”, but to me, a college student who makes LESS than $70 a week and is doing an UNPAID civics teaching internship Monday-Friday, then working Saturday and Sunday at a bookstore in the mall-It Damm well is. I am so livid over this whole thing especially when I have sent SO MUCH business Amazon’s way, and have recommended customers look to them when I can’t find a book at work and I have also recommended my fellow college students open their own retail store with them. Maybe to RUPA and the rest of you at AMAZON, $45 or even $90 is your Friday night bar tab at Santana Row, but for me, that is almost one-third of my MONTHLY RENT, yes ONE-THIRD…….. I am seriously considering closing my seller and buyers account once this whole issue is settled, and I will stop recommending you to them and start recomending Barnes & Noble for them to sell their used books with…. they might not be a better choice, but they haven’t charged me $45 for a book that I have no way to get back. I have usually gotten great customer service from AMAZON when I have purchased items, but even as a “seller” I am still a customer. I don’t know why I am being treated differently in this capacity….

    [Reply]

    Sam Ib Reply:

    AVOID DEALING WITH AMAZON THEY DID IN THE PAST HELD $5500.00 FOR 180 DAYS TILL THEY PAID ME ,THEY CLOSED MY ACCOUNT FOR NO REASON AT THE TIME I WAS SELLING SOFTWARE AND WA AN AUTHORISED EALER OF MICROSOFT AND LISENCED , BUT THEY DECIDED THAT MAYBE THE SOFTWARE IS NO GOOD , I SOLD SO MUCH AND IN THE 180 DAYS WHEN THEY PAID ME MY MONEY BACK ALL SOFTWARE WAS GREAT AND HUNDREDS OF GOOD FEEDBACKS FROM BUYERS AND AMAZON NEVER GAVE A DAMN ABOUT ME NOT EVEN APOLOGISED BUT MY STUPIDITY I SHOULD HAVE TAKE THEM TO COURT WISHED I DID THAT NOW IT IS OVER 4 YEARS AND CANT DO THAT. BUT NEVER RECOMMEND AMAZON TO ANY ONE THEY SELL GARBAGE AND THETE PRICES ARE TOO HIGH. AMAZON SUX BIG TIMES HOPE TO SEE THEM OUT OF BUSINESS ONE DAY . THEN ALL DRINKS WILL BE ON ME .

    [Reply]

  112. DragonDon.net – Outlawed by Amazon DRM

    [...] This is another example of why you should avoid Amazon. [...]

  113. Sam Ib

    AMAZON SUX BIG TIMES AND WILL NEVER EVER BUY ANYTHING THERE,ANYWAY IF YOU GO TO EBAY YOU WILL FIND BETTER DEALS AND YOU ARE PROTECTED . AMAZON HAS THE HIGHEST PRICES OUT THERE AND THEY SELL GARBAGE ALL THE CRAP FROM CHINA NOTHING GOOD. IF THEY HAVE PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE I WOULD SAY OK MAYBE BUT ALL THE MINIMUM WAGE PEOPLE THAT WORKS FOR THEM THAT DO NOT KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING HELL WHAT A LOSER COMPANY .I WILL SUGEST THAT YOU GO DIRECT TO THE SELLERS LIKE YOU SEE J&R OR B&H AND YOU WILL FIND AT THERE WON WEBSITE LOWER PRICES THEY HAVE TO HIGHER THE PRICE CAUSE AMAZON IS A CROOK AND THEY CHARGE A HIGH COMMISSION TO THE SELLERS THAN EBAY .SO THE SELLERS ADDS IT AND HERE WE GO .GO TO FOCUS CAMERA AND BUY DIRECT THEY HAVE GREAT PRICES AND GREAT SERVICE JUST BUY DIRECT DO NOT BUY IT AT AMAZON .BASECLY ALL NY SELLERS ARE THE LOWEST PRICES IN THE COUNTRY AS I AM IN CA AND ALWAYS BYT FROM NY , FREE SHIPPING NO TAX AND LOWER PRICES. AVOID AMAZON THEY ARE A TRASH CAN.

    [Reply]

  114. Eric

    I will NEVER purchase anything from these dolts again! Against my better judgement I was told by co-workers to give this ‘service’ a try. My first attempt ever turned into a complete nightmare. They sent the item to an adress I lived at 3 addresses ago! They claimed they could not re-route the item and when I went to purchase the item again it had DOUBLED in price that day! When I asked for a supervisor (after 2 hours on hold) His solution was to just “go buy it at the store”! Why didn’t I think of that.?!?!

    What a fucking joke! This is why I don’t like using these over-bloated web stores. They get too big for their britches and just have no intent on pleasing the customer.

    [Reply]

  115. Unhappy Customer

    BUYER BEWARE!!!!

    AMAZON is a shady company. I will not be buying anything from them ever again. I have never had any problems with them before but this one is enough to make me stop.

    I purchased and item on Thanksgiving for Christmas. Because the return policy was extended until Jan 31st, I felt that there was no need to inspect the item immediately. Especially since it was a 85 lb game table and it was supposed to be a surprise for my kids.

    On Christmas Eve, I opened the box to set it up and notice the table was damaged. I immediately submitted a return request. Since the seller did not contact me within a week, I filed an A-Z claim with AMAZON.

    To my surprise, I received and email from AMAZON stating that the claim had been closed because the seller return policy of 10 days was stated on the website.

    I immediately went to the seller page where it stated that no return/refund policy had been submitted to AMAZON. When I call customer service, the representative reopened the case and also stated this same fact and included a link to the page where it showed that no return/refund policy was included. Since no return/refund policy was included it is supposed to follow AMAZON policy.

    However, I received a final email from AMAZON stating the claim was closed and they will not be responding to anymore questions regarding this claim. That is not even the worst part, now the sellers page is updated with their new return/refund policy, AMAZING!!!!

    I am very certain that I cannot file a claim with my credit card because it also belongs to AMAZON.

    Thanks a lot AMAZON for a very disappointing Christmas and unhappy New Year!

    [Reply]

  116. derek

    I fucking hate amazon I try to buy something then it say sorry it is incompatible and signs me out then when I try to sign back and it changed my password and I am so pissed I yelled at the them on the phone

    [Reply]

  117. Outlawed by Amazon DRM « Stuff Found

    [...] This is another example of why you should avoid Amazon. [...]

  118. Philipp

    Watch this documentation about amazon in Germany. You won’t belive it!

    http://mediathek.daserste.de/sendungen_a-z/799280_reportage-dokumentation/13402260_ausgeliefert-leiharbeiter-bei-amazon

    [Reply]

    Jessie Livermore Reply:

    is there an english translator?

    [Reply]

  119. Davia

    Thank you for all your efforts in creating this site to inform people of what is going on with Amazon. What is happening to others affects all of us. I agree if we all support our small businesses to thrive than we all will prosper and money will flow freely for the masses.

    [Reply]

  120. Jessie Livermore

    Amazon and Jeff Bezos are very deceptive. Amazon has become a compilation of third party vendors. They constantly engage in bait and switch offering a very cheap price only to be redirected to the site which inturn charges a higher price.
    Amazon also engages in very questionable accounting practices which grossly inflates their profits. No other company could get away with it.
    Recently, Jeff Bezos made a 5 million dollar investment with Henry Blodget. For those of you who don’t know who Henry Blodget is, he is a wall street analyst who was pumping up stocks on CNBC, etc, then secretly sending privaate emails to his better clients telling them that these same stock were garbage and to sell them. He has and is still hyping Amazon making Bezos richer. For this, Jeff Bezos has rewarded him with 5 million dollars. These two guys are crooks and should be in jail. Amazon should be boycotted to put a stop to this wall street manipulation.
    There is no reason to buy from amazon. They are usually the most expensive site on the interent. Before your next purchase, look on thefind.com or even ebay. You’ll see that there are many vendors who offer better pricing than amazon with no sales tax and free shipping. I have saved thousands by avoiding amazon. The only reason to shop amazon is if you wish to royally overpay. That smiley face arrow on amazon’s boxes are symbolic of Jeff Bezos laughing all the way to the bank at all the ignorant people who overpay on his site.

    [Reply]

  121. Robert Smith

    I also don’t use Amazon or Walmart as they abuse their employees destroy small business and as a result are bad for the world in general.

    [Reply]

  122. Sydney ()

    I am only 17 and have been reading this page for about 2 hours now. This has majorly changed my view on amazon… I think I have ordered my last Item from there.

    [Reply]

  123. Qril

    I buy from amazon because I have a disability that prevents me from driving. And I can read a large number of books in a month.

    [Reply]

  124. Steph

    I found this page by googling ‘does anyone not buy from Amazon’. I’m glad to see people don’t. I have a couple of small internet businesses and I’m in competition with Amazon constantly trying to have the lowest price, etc. Although I do sell through them for some products, I only do that to make meager sales. i have two products I have them fulfill for me and they take a ridiculous amount of profit off every item I sell. Not to mention, if they damage your item and it’s their fault, they will only reimburse you what they THINK it’s worth, which is usually less than my cost. You can send them your original invoice and they come back with some excuse how they won’t use it. Although their customer service for sellers is typically good, if you have a money issue to deal with, you WILL get the short end of the stick. On top of that, they make you wait 45 days before they reimburse you for anything. AND they still keep fees from the sale you made, so you STILL lose money even on a return! I yanked a lot of inventory from their FBA program due to these problems. I hate that they take business from me and I wish more people supported small businesses instead of making the rich richer. Knowing that we live in an ‘Amazon world’ when it comes to shipping, personally I try to get the product out the door in a day or two and my service is better than theirs. If everyone helped out their fellow Americans, we might have a better economy!

    [Reply]

    Pierre Reply:

    A 12oz can of Barkeepers Friend cleaner is $5.00 at Amazon. With a quick search on Bing, I found a 15oz can of it for $1.48. Amazon was 337% more expensive.
    Second season of Sponge Bob on DVD at Amazon is $16.73. eBay has it buy it now with no tax and free shipping for $15.40 and Barnes and Noble has it for $14.50.
    A Generac 6244 will cost you $4997,00 plus tax at Amazon. You can buy it for $4194.00 with no tax and free shipping at Electricgeneratorsdirect.com
    I could go on and on but the reality is that Amazon has some of the most expensive pricing on the Internet. Search bing or google or eBay or thefind.com and you’ll see that there are many vendors that offer far better pricing than amazon. Most offer free shipping so why pay Amazon $79 per year for that privilege.
    If you bought it on Amazon, you grossly overpaid. The next time you see an amazon box, you can chuckle because you know that customer overpaid.
    Bezos was once overheard saying “thank god for stupid people”. That smiley face arrow on their boxes is symbolic of Bezos laughing all the way to the bank at all the stupid people who overpaid on his site.

    Sent from my iPad

    [Reply]

  125. jason

    i have bought a phone from amazon and i’m still waiting for the phone to be dispatched it’s has been 4 weeks, so i contacted amazon when i’m going to receive the phone they told me to contact the seller so i did then i didn’t get a respond from the seller so i contacted amazon again saying that i didn’t get any respond they told me it’s between me and the seller to solve the problem so i don’t why i’m using there website to buy things off there website with my money it’s none off there business when you come a cross a problem

    [Reply]

  126. Khammy

    Amazon really is a bully & don’t care about their sellers.
    Force their sellers to sell their items on Amazon much cheaper & still take commission & it is sooooooooo hard to speak with anyone.
    They just cancel or suspend sellers’ accounts without notice and their customer service assistants are sooooooooo rude too.
    They always infringe their own regulations too.
    So i have cancelled my account & will NEVER buy from them again.
    I would rather support smaller businesses online & local bookshops or other companies.
    They also sell products soooooo cheaply, thus ‘enticing’ users to buy from their stores making other businesses bankrupt.
    They literally go to sellers’ websites & send them emails about delivery & item prices comparing it to the uploaded details on Amazon.

    I think there should be a competition; all the businesses are now selling on amazon & ignoring their own websites & businesses.

    The company also takes sooooooo long to despatch items.
    They want everything, tablet, store, phones, shoes, cds, books…..it is a bit much.
    To be fair i have bought some books & cheaper cds but i will never AGAIN!

    [Reply]

  127. Khammy

    What is this about AMAZON:
    Is it true?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYUJjpIxkCU

    [Reply]

  128. Pierre

    A 12oz can of Barkeepers Friend cleaner is $5.00 at Amazon. With a quick search on Bing, I found a 15oz can of it for $1.48. Amazon was 337% more expensive.
    Second season of Sponge Bob on DVD at Amazon is $16.73. eBay has it buy it now with no tax and free shipping for $15.40 and Barnes and Noble has it for $14.50.
    A Generac 6244 will cost you $4997,00 plus tax at Amazon. You can buy it for $4194.00 with no tax and free shipping at Electricgeneratorsdirect.com
    I could go on and on but the reality is that Amazon has some of the most expensive pricing on the Internet. Search bing or google or eBay or thefind.com and you’ll see that there are many vendors that offer far better pricing than amazon. Most offer free shipping so why pay Amazon $79 per year for that privilege.
    If you bought it on Amazon, you grossly overpaid. The next time you see an amazon box, you can chuckle because you know that customer overpaid.
    Bezos was once overheard saying “thank god for stupid people”. That smiley face arrow on their boxes is symbolic of Bezos laughing all the way to the bank at all the stupid people who overpaid on his site.

    Sent from my iPad

    [Reply]

    Jungle G Reply:

    As seller, we price our products higher on Amazon than other platforms to offset the fact that Amazon’s purported emphasis on “customer service” has created two very bad side effects for sellers: Amazon staff making frivolous harassment of sellers in the name of “customer service” which they know nothing about, and as the consequence, many bad Amazon buyers making frivolous demands abetted by Amazon staffers. “Customer Service” gone mad at Amazon is not free to sellers, and the cost has to be passed on to customers. It’s an example of just because you can does not mean you should. In terms of pricing of products, Amazon hurts its own customers by its own hubris.

    [Reply]

  129. Sue M ()

    Dear Khammy, it is indeed true. This company, and its likely offshoring of profits, is (part of) what’s wrong with this country. Most of these “fulillment centers” work people like slaves and use temps. As a reader and a writer, I use Powell’s. I will not use Amazon or EBay, the ultimate fencing site. I will not make Bezos any freaking more wealthy than he already is. Either mom and pop web shops go out of business or survive if they knuckle under to become an Amazon shop. This jerk is the Tony Soprano of the Internet.

    -But that’s just my opinion.

    [Reply]

  130. Alison Sorlie

    I agree, they are awful. I have been lazy and used them for convenience.

    The deciding factor for me was when I sold some items with them. They take huge fees and won’t listen if you are in dispute with a buyer. They are really mean to sellers.

    I have a low income and still need to buy some items online. I’m now using amazon as a search engine. After finding an item I seek out the website of a suitable seller and go to them direct. And I will be buying my Christmas presents at my lovely independent bookstore.

    [Reply]

    J.J. Reply:

    Amazon has a group of over-paid, self-absorbed, entitled brats working for them who has no understanding of what hard work or customer service is, but they unscrupulously try to increase sales at any cost with no regard to any accountability. They have routinely used sellers’ money to “buy” customer satisfaction by randomly, capriciously, excessively giving out refunds using sellers’ money. They have also routinely violate their own policies by keeping sellers’ money for too long unjustifiably and without any reason. There has been at least one lawsuit by sellers over their hooligan tactics. Amazon is a group of snakes with many snake heads beginning with the always crazy Jeff “the Bozo” Bezos.

    [Reply]

  131. Ann

    Wow, I never knew about this. Yes, I know how powerful Amazon is but never knew how mean and harsh they also were. I’m starting to realize that a lot of powerful corporations are also unthoughtful. It’s just so sad, and thank you for sharing this post with us!

    [Reply]

    J.J. Reply:

    If you have ever met a thug a school, club, or on the streets, imagine having hundreds or them at one place–Amazon. If you have not met a thug, imagine a rude, mean, harsh, anti-social individual who care nothing above your right, your interest, your existence, nothing is of any import except what he wants–Amazon.

    [Reply]

  132. Pjessel

    Amazon isthe best! Love u Amazon!

    [Reply]

  133. Scott Bryant

    Well, got a little surprise today from Amazon.com. I had my identity stolen. Someone set up an account in my name and stole $54.75 out of my bank account! Amazon was able to stop 1 transaction for $15.50, but the other for $39.25 can not be stop! They refused to tell me what was ordered, who ordered it, or where it originated from. I will be visiting the bank tomorrow to dispute both charges. I told the lady by not giving me any of the information about the false account, they are protecting the thieves! DO NOT BUY FROM AMAZON.COM!!!!!

    [Reply]

  134. allyson riley

    They take pride in how the treat their buyers… but have no customer loyalties to their sellers. I hate Amazon. Abe books is much cheaper. Ebay you can see what you are actually buying. I sold a book on Amazon. I had to refund the book to start the return policy. He got his money back. I never saw my book. Amazon never called me back when I googled their number to call them. (as a seller you can not find their number.) I tried three times to close the account and can not.

    [Reply]

  135. Rebecca

    Glad this blog is here.

    Double billed by Amazon this past November. Order shipped in two shipments. Billed on two payments – except they billed the full amount and billed again for the second shipment. Six customer service reps., two hours on the phone and eight emails later nothing is resolved. One rep states I was billed the correct amount in two payments, another rep states I was billed only once and the extra charge was only a touch on the account. One wonders if they’re working off different sets of books. I showed the emails to my bank and they rescinded the second charge.

    (One email from amazon: “Hello, This is Susie in Charge Inquiries at Amazon.
    I’m sorry that there is a problem with the charges associated with your order #xxxxxx – total amount of order is $131.68.
    Amazon shows that we have only charged you $17.96 and $113.72. You mentioned that your bank is showing transactions of $17.96 and $131.68. Amazon hasn’t received a payment for $131.68.”)

    (Another email later: “Hello, I’ve verified that we only charged you once for your item The Reference manual: For the Health Care Professional”. The additional $17.96 that you see on your bank statement other than the $131.68 on your order total is not an actual charge, that is just an authorization which your bank is holding to just validate the transaction. This amount will drop depending on your bank policy. . . . . Best regards, Ciara “)

    This was paid by check not credit or debit card. Incompetent billing has now turned into fraud and extortion. Deplorable business practices. Checks to amazon are processed through Telecheck. Telecheck’s collection department TRS has now sent a letter of demand for the bogus charge and a fee on top. Telecheck states there is a stop payment on the check, even that is incorrect, check was rescinded. I now am unable to write checks at my local merchants that use telecheck.

    A letter will go out to Jeff Bezos. amazon needs to show cause. amazon already showed the charge was bogus in their email.

    amazon is blocking me from purchases – so I’ve spent my money this past christmas season elsewhere. And will continue to do so.

    Nice part is – I’m realizing what a monopoly amazon has on the marketplace. Visions of walmart online. There are certain items I cannot buy because the seller has an exclusive agreement to sell that item only on amazon.

    Hi Jeff – look for my letter in the mail.

    [Reply]

  136. Paul Day ()

    Thanks for this article. It backs up what I already know about how Amazon treats not only its customers, but its authors. On PiA, which I co-founded, I highlight various aspects of Amazon listing practices and the unfair way it treats indie authors. Clearly, Amazon is diseased and the disease has a name and its name is GREED.

    [Reply]

  137. Hayden James ()

    Its use or be used. These big companies just don’t have the capability or better yet want to make the investments needed to have the capability to manage issues like these better. My biggest issue with amazon is they don’t listen to their own reviews or feedback. I’ve taken a loss here or there but overall I save every year using them and capitalizing on their oversights in the customer’ favor. At there massize size they can’t be perfect, far from it, they also know they don’t have to be, that would be worth it. Its a use or be used system so rather that avoid them completely find ways to gain from them off their own errors. I’ve found they lax in BOTH direction very often. After they first screwed me I purchased stock in AMZN back in 2010 and its tripled in value since. Try find ways to always cover your losses and gain off of these companies.

    [Reply]

  138. Josh

    Amazon is evil you’re right. The other day I was shopping for swim goggles on there and Amazon was so desperate for me to sign up Amazon Prime they reduced the cost of my goggles to nothing! (w/ free shipping. $0 order.)

    I feel really bad shopping at Amazon, not only are all your reasons extremely valid but they treat their warehouse workers extremely poorly. I feel bad shopping there but I don’t have any money coming in and I get Amazon Gift cards. I guess I could give away the Amazon gift cards? But then it’s just somebody else using them…Oh, the tangled web we weave…

    [Reply]

  139. Steven

    Well It seems that I cannot sell any of my used watches myself on Amazon.
    Last time I buy anything from them

    [Reply]

  140. EWE

    Wait. Your whole point doesn’t make sense. Just as Macmillan is a business that has the freedom to set their own prices, Amazon is a business, in this case retailer, that has the freedom to set their prices. Merely because they are bigger and more successful doesn’t mean that they have lost the right to set the conditions for business relationships.

    Take the $1 store, they decide that they only want to sell items prized at $1 or less. As such anyone that wants to charge more than that amount for his products cannot sell through the $1 store. The $1 store removes the buy-buttons for those products by not featuring them in the store. It’s just the same with Amazon. They set their prizes and those that do not want or can deal with that cannot work with Amazon. As a consequence Amazon does not get to sell their products (a loss for them) and the producer does not get to sell through Amazon. What’s not fair?

    [Reply]

    Jungle G Reply:

    Might does not make right. The government has legitimate power to tax, but if personal tax rate is 75%, would you like it? Police has legitimate power to prevent crime, but if you get stopped and searched every time they see you driving around past midnight for being suspicious, would you like it? Microsoft has overwhelming dominance in PC software, and at one time, tried to limit competition by making competitors’ products less compatible with PC OS. Were MS within their right to do so, or is it inconvenient and bad deal for consumers and hindrance to progress? If every person and corporation exercise their legal right to the max without regard to any other value or interest, it would be a unpleasant world for everyone.

    [Reply]

    EWE Reply:

    The interchangeable use of ‘might’ as in power and ‘right’ as in moral or legal entitlement in your comment is a bit confusing. Perhaps you mean…

    (1) Having the power (might) to do something doesn’t make whatever you want to do legally or morally right. Obviously that is true. Just because I am stronger than a child doesn’t mean I can violently or by other unreasonable means subject it to my will.

    but perhaps, and more significantly, you mean,

    (2) Having the legal right to do something doesn’t mean that you have the moral right to do it. This is supported by your police example. Though this is a point people do have disputes over, it seems reasonable to agree to that given many governments over world who now and in the past have existed and made laws that were morally apprehensible, this is true.

    In any case, I was claiming that Amazon not only has the legal but also the moral right to decide whose products it wants to sell and under which conditions it intends to do so. After all, hardly anyone would find the $1 Store’s policy in that regards reprehensible. So why do you find Amazon’s wrong if it is based on the same principle? Merely because it reaches a greater audience or because you haven’t heard of anyone being turned down by the $1 Store?

    [Reply]

    trish Reply:

    EWE, your example of the $1 store doesn’t work. The $1 store purchases overstock and random items. It’s my understanding they’re usually asked to buy things, and manufacturers, knowing the price point of the dollar store, will give them things at the right price because it’s a win / win (offloading unsellable/unwanted merchandise to a store that wants it). Conversely, Amazon is telling publishers what price point to use based on what’s good for Amazon, not what’s good for the publishing industry.

    We have laws against monopolies (anti-trust laws), which would seem to indicate we, as a society, don’t want one company dictating a whole industry. Amazon is trying to do that.

    [Reply]

    Jungle G Reply:

    The issue here is ” ‘I’ Hate Amazon…” Therefore, each comment necessarily involves personal appraisal of Amazon based on personal values, which includes “moral” values. And moral is a subjective concept, religious doctrinaires notwithstanding–each has a belief as to whether not having beard is moral or having multiple wives or having wealth. But the issue here does not implicate attempt to determine whether Amazon has clearly defined, universally accepted “moral,” legal, and/or other right to be a bully or a monopolist or ruthless price-setter. The issue is “whatever Amazon can do, does not mean that it should or that it’s right.” The issue merely allows expressions of personal takes on the issue. My take is that from personal experience dealing with some of their people, I definitely think it’s a very bad idea to allow these psychotic jerks even more market and financial clout. And “might” here simply means the capacity or power to exert one’s will, whether that’s based on legal right, market clout, financial edge, contractual terms, strength of force, superior military, or even “moral” power. In the police example, police has both legal right and moral right (public want them to keep bad elements in check) to search people that they deem “suspicious.” Some may think anyone driving around late at night in an SUV wearing hood/suit/jeans/push-up bra to be highly suspicious, and they may have good reasons to have such suspicion. But does that make you feel better that they have every right to do so? Or 75% tax? Nothing about $1 stores pertains to the discussion here, does not translate, totally besides the point. Assume that $1 stores have every right to do whatever they do. That does not diminish the reasons why some people hate Amazon and the reasons therefore.

    EWE Reply:

    @ trish:

    I don’t want to split hairs over how the $1 Store operates. I am doubtful that it actually is the way you describe it and from what I see, they often sell items that are regularly priced lower than $1 in other stores (salt priced at $0.69 at Whole Foods costs, you guessed it, $1 at the $1 Store). In any case, how the $1 store actually works is immaterial. All that suffices for the example to work is to imagine a $1 store that only buys from sellers items it can prize at $1. In that thought experiment, the store decides which producers it wants to work with by its restriction to $1 sales. You would not find this wrong. And there isn’t the win-win in the sense you described in this thought experiment, so that’s not it (I won’t discuss why that isn’t a good point in real life).

    @ Jungle G

    I am not sure how you came to the understanding that morality is subjective… Let’s think a bit back in history and remember all the atrocities committed. Now say again that there isn’t a right and wrong in action. Also, if this is just a platform to “express personal takes” that cannot possible be of any impact or significance since they only apply to me, then why are we having a discussion? It’s like saying I like vanilla and you like chocolate. What a waste of time.

    Lastly, it seems obvious that someone having “moral” power,” assuming you mean they actually and truly know what the right thing to do is (let’s leave out the matter of certainty), they should do whatever that thing is. Why would I feel bad about them doing what is right, unless I am of course mistakingly thinking they are doing the wrong thing. If the police is actually justified in searching the car and has every reason to do so, then they must do so and if I am inconvenienced or not feeling good about it, all the worse for me. I am likely mistaken about what the right thing to do is. But then, of course, you don’t think that there is such a thing as objective morality. So all bets are off.

    It was a pleasure talking to you all! Over and out.

    Jungle G Reply:

    The issue here is ” ‘I’ Hate Amazon…” Therefore, each comment necessarily involves personal appraisal of Amazon based on personal values, which includes “moral” values. And moral is a subjective concept, religious doctrinaires notwithstanding–each has a belief as to whether not having beard is moral or having multiple wives or having wealth. But the issue here does not implicate attempt to determine whether Amazon has clearly defined, universally accepted “moral,” legal, and/or other right to be a bully or a monopolist or ruthless price-setter. The issue is “whatever Amazon can do, does not mean that it should or that it’s right.” The issue merely allows expressions of personal takes on the issue. My take is that from personal experience dealing with some of their people, I definitely think it’s a very bad idea to allow these psychotic jerks even more market and financial clout. And “might” here simply means the capacity or power to exert one’s will, whether that’s based on legal right, market clout, financial edge, contractual terms, strength of force, superior military, or even “moral” power. In the police example, police has both legal right and moral right (public want them to keep bad elements in check) to search people that they deem “suspicious.” Some may think anyone driving around late at night in an SUV wearing hood/suit/jeans/push-up bra to be highly suspicious, and they may have good reasons to have such suspicion. But does that make you feel better that they have every right to do so? Or 75% tax? Nothing about $1 stores pertains to the discussion here, does not translate, totally besides the point. Assume that $1 stores have every right to do whatever they do. That does not diminish the reasons why some people hate Amazon and the reasons therefore.

    [Reply]

  141. EWE

    I just typed a response to those two comments and it didn’t get submitted through the form. I think you might want to fix it. It takes forever to load and then at first doesn’t show the comment. I had the problem with the other comments before, but then it displayed. Hopefully this works.

    In any case, I am too busy to re-type the stuff. Thanks for talking. Over and out.

    [Reply]

  142. Bhenchod

    Kya Chutiya bana rahe ho bhosdiwalo.Tumhari Maa, behen ko chodu.
    Teri GAND me mera LUND.

    [Reply]

  143. Alexander Brown

    goddammit i was just falling in love with my kindle and audible account and instant watch with all the hbo shows when i just had to find this article….why cant there be anything good in this world

    [Reply]

  144. Hans Mouritzen

    This morning I made the terrible discovery that my much admired Amazon is not as kind and gently as I naively has believed for years.
    After reading a lot of the entries on this blog, it struck me if Amazon knows about this? If not, shouldn’t they?
    Would it be worth it to let them know that for whatever reason we no longer trust or like them?
    amazon-pr@amazon.com

    [Reply]

  145. Chris

    I will never buy from Amazon, simply because I have had the misfortune to work for them. I prefer to buy from a physical store, but I am not entirely buying online, I will just avoid Amazon.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    I meant to write that I am not entirely against buying online.

    [Reply]

    Kerry K. Reply:

    Amazon is well known for being very abusive, unscrupulous, and harsh against their own workers, sellers, and distributors. Led by the all-psycho Jeff Bozos, Amazon put up a front to attract consumers’ money, but is rotten to the core inside. To know Amazon is to hate Amazon.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Yes, I had heard from friends (as well as comments on the internet) about them. I, perhaps foolishly, thought I might have a different experience there.

    [Reply]

    hilary Reply:

    AMAZON DISTRIBUTION CENTERS ARE SWEAT SHOPS WHERE WORKERS ARE TREATED ABUSIVELY WITH CONSTANT DEMAND FOR WORK AND LITTLE OR NO BREAK TIME. AMAZON IS CONSTANTLY INVOLVED IN DISPUTES WITH BOOK PUBLISHERS AND AUTHORS. AMAZON IS HATED BY IT’S OWN SELLERS. AMAZON IS RUN BY A BUNCH OF SHIT HEAD ASSHOLES WHO HAVE NO CONCERN FOR ANY RULE OR NORM. ONLY AMAZON CAN COME UP WITH SUCH RIDICULOUS PRODUCT AS A CELL PHONE WHOSE MAIN REASON FOR BEING IS TO PUSH MORE PRODUCTS ON THE USERS. WHO WANTS CONSTANT AND INCESSANT DINNER-INTERRUPTING SALES CALLS RIGHT IN THE POCKET? NOW AMAZON CAN’T GIVE AWAY THESE PHONES. GOOD THING ALIBABA IS PLANNING TO COME TO US. IT ALREADY HAS HIGHER MARKET CAPITALIZATION THAN THE EVIL AMAZON WITH ALL IT’S SCHEMING AND SCAMMING TO FOREVER EXPAND IT’S SALES REACH AND CONSTANTLY LOSING MONEYH IN CATERING TO IT’S MEGALOMANIA.

    [Reply]

  146. Em ()

    ???? I offered a wreck it journal a couple weeks ago and they said it would come Tuesday, we had a email saying it will come Thursday, it’s Thursday today and no wreck it journal came????????

    [Reply]

  147. $vix

    Amazon has become the most expensive site on the web. Search for the next item you want to buy on bing google or eBay.

    You’ll find many vendors with far better pricing than amazon and free shipping. And, most offer free shipping…. for free. Why pay amazon $100 per year for the privilege. Best Buy, Home Depot, Target Red, Walmart etc all have better pricing.

    Just bought a 4 pack of Duracell Quantum batteries at home depot for $4.98 per pack. Amazon has the same 4 pack for $6.99 per pack.
    The only reason to shop amazon is if you wish to grossly overpay. Search before you buy on amazon, it could save you a fortune.

    [Reply]

  148. David Ayala

    Seems to me the best way to kick Amazon in the nutz is to launch a website that sells only books (E, hard, soft, etc.) and get ALL publishers to sell via that website. It would take a lot of organization, communication and such but in 6 months I bet it could be done. I’m sure publishers are tired of Scamazons BS, too.

    [Reply]

  149. Tomasiepants

    I think the same way you do. Good to know I’m not alone.

    [Reply]

  150. C ()

    I have had two recent problems with Amazon. The first I ordred a small item with one click ordering that was supposed to have free shipping. They ended up charging me as much as the product to ship. When I complained they said I requested expedited shipping,which isn’t possible with one click. They refused to help in any way.

    Second, I had a “ghost” order show up in my email this morning. It had been in my cart, but I had never placed the order. It is a $5 item that they have now charged me $18 for and are shipping even though I didn’t place the order. I requested cancellation, and have gotten NO HELP.

    The first time I cancelled my PRIME membership. Now that I no longer feel safe on Amazon, I am cancelling my account all together.

    [Reply]

  151. nea ()

    I read your post here and I guess I don’t understand what the big deal is that Amazon (a place I frequent) wants to charge less for books that are worth what Amazon is charging versus what the greedy publisher wants, thinking in my head that a $30 book is really worth $15 or so, like T-shirts made for change in Hong Kong but sold to us at Nordstrom’s at a premium. So the publisher gets one less yacht, I want my book at .99 because not a whole lot of people read physical books anymore. I read a lot from Kindle and I shop at Wal-Mart, and until one of these entities does something really terrible to me, I am going to continue to get my products dirt cheap. *besides, half the time local businesses don’t have in stock or carry what I am looking for. *

    [Reply]

  152. PD

    I like a bargain just as much as everyone else, but I also appreciate honesty; and bogus reviews should not be allowed on any product; and writers and publishers should be allowed to set their own prices and not be bullied. In the end we are a global economy, and I pride myself in having my books printed in American and in the other countries where they are sold in order to keep people in those countries working. I pay top prices on all my printing because I want quality that will last. And when the solar flare takes out your mobile device, you won’t have that book in your hand. You will have lost it all. It is good when anyone reads, but as in all things, you do get what you pay for when you purchase anything. What people don’t get is everything works together and in the end only those who have profited at the expense of others end up surviving. We need to change the message, or we are all guilty of great wrong. We become our own enslavers as well as the enslavers of others when we only look at the sticker price.

    [Reply]

  153. Connie Betzler

    You think you have it bad???? I was fired because I reported that my stalker neighbor vandalized my car. Once I reported it to security, I no longer had a job. SO, tell me about your problem!

    [Reply]

  154. Connie Betzler

    Oh really!!! Let me tell you, I was fired because I reported that my neighbor is stalking me and had vandalized my car in the parking lot of Amazon.

    [Reply]

  155. Connie Betzler

    I am going to make sure that these questionable employment practices are known throughout the world.

    [Reply]

    hilary Reply:

    AMAZON IS OPERATED BY A BUNCH OF SPOILED, SELF-CENTERED, SHIT-HEAD ASSHOLES. IT’S STUPIDITY IS EVIDENT IN IT’S LONG STREAK OF LOSING MONEY–THE STOCK MARKET HAS BEEN BEGUILED BY IT’S CONSTANT EXPANSION. NOW, ALIBABA, A COMPANY WITH HIGHER MARKET VALUE AND ENORMOUSLY PROFITABLE, IS SETTING IT’S SIGHT ON THIS MARKET. THIS IS A COMPANY WITH MARKET CAP MORE THAN AMAZON AND EBAY COMBINED, WITH PROFIT OF MORE THAN $2 BILLION A YEAR, AS WELL AS A PENCHANT FOR SOCIAL CONSCIOUSNESS. IN THE END, THE SHIT-HEADED ASSHOLES AT AMAZON WILL BE KILLED BY THEIR OWN COMPLETELY SELF-ABSORBED, SELF-CENTERED, DERANGED SHIT-HEADEDNESS.

    [Reply]

  156. Yvonne Ricard

    I hate Amazon as well. What a way to do business! You order an item, get the confirmation online, then you find out they don’t have it, but they have already debited your account. Then its up to you to go to your bank with the cancellation number, and hope that your bank will release the funds ‘someday’, back into your account. I live in a semi-rural area with marginal shopping. From now on, I’ll just wait until I get to the ‘big city’, to get what I need, or go without.

    [Reply]

  157. joe

    As both buyer and seller on Amazon, I have seen the very uneven way that Amazon processes A-Z claims and enforces its policies.. Amazon regularly abuses smaller seller, but protects high volume sellers by invoking it’s rules and policies. For example, Amazon would regularly grant A-Z claims and give full refund to dishonest buyers for products that they have broken after using them for more than a month. Yet, Amazon would deem it okay for a high volume seller to refuse refund or give partial refund for truly defective products. Amazon is very dishonest and corrupt in applying the very same rules that it itself has established. Fraud regularly occurs on Amazon by both buyers and sellers, and rules are regularly bent by Amazon for it’s own benefit. Thus, in effect, there is no rule on Amazon. Whatever benefits Amazon more in any given situation sets the rule. It’s total bullshit that Amazon is “customer-centric;” eBay does a far, far better job of enforcing rules evently.

    [Reply]

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